Malagasy ethnies : Malagasy

Malagasy ethnies : Central

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Antakay

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Betsileo

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Bezanozano

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Merina

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Merina : Ambaniandro

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Merina : Amboalambo

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Merina : Borizano

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Merina : Hova

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Sihanaka

Malagasy ethnies : Central : Vakinankaratra

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Andriambahoaka

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Anjoaty

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Betanimena

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Betsimisaraka

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Betsimisaraka : Zanamalata

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Betsimisaraka : Northern Betsimisaraka (Antavaratra, Tavaratra)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Betsimisaraka : Southern Betsimisaraka (Antatsimo, Tatsimo)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Sahafatra

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Sahavoay

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Saint Mariens

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Antambahoaka (Tambahoaka)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Tanala (Antanala)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Tanala (Antanala) : Zafindiamanana

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Tefasy (Antefasy, Antaifasy)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Tefasy (Antefasy, Antaifasy) : Zafisoro

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Temoro (Antemoro, Antaimoro)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Tesaka (Antesaka, Antaisaka)

Malagasy ethnies : Eastern : Zafimaniry

Malagasy ethnies : Northern

Malagasy ethnies : Northern : Tankarana (Antankarana, Tekarana, Antekarana)

Malagasy ethnies : Northern : Tsimihety

Malagasy ethnies : North-western

Malagasy ethnies : North-western : Antalaotra

Malagasy ethnies : Southern

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Imamono

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Manonga

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Marovola

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Masitoka

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Vilakatsy

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Zafimandomboka

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Zafimarozaha

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Zafindrendriko

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Tevondro (Antevondro)

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Tsienimbalala

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Zafimanely

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Zafimarozaha

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Bara : Zafindravola

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Karimbola (Karembola)

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Kimosy

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Mahafale (Mahafaly)

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy)

Malagasy ethnies : Southern : Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy) : Afomarolahy

Malagasy ethnies : South-eastern

Malagasy ethnies : South-eastern : Tanosy (Antanosy)

Malagasy ethnies : South-eastern : Tanosy (Antanosy) : Fareze (Tefareze, Antanosy Tefareze, "Tambolo")

Malagasy ethnies : South-western

Malagasy ethnies : South-western : Korao

Malagasy ethnies : South-western : Masikoro

Malagasy ethnies : South-western : Masikoro : Andrevola

Malagasy ethnies : South-western : Mikea

Malagasy ethnies : South-western : Tañalaña

Malagasy ethnies : Western

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Beosy

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Makoa

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Menabe

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Bemazava (Sakalava)

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Northern Sakalava

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Sakalava Analalava

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Sakalava Menabe

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Sambirano

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Southern Sakalava

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Sakalava : Sakalava Boeina

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Vazimba

Malagasy ethnies : Western : Vezo

Malagasy ethnies : Other

Malagasy ethnies : Other : Wakwak

Malagasy ethnies : Other : Kibushi (Shibushi)

boittinpatrick ndBoittin, Patrick. n.d. Etude monographique de Bezaha.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Social sciences - other,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Mahafale (Mahafaly),
Southern,
Bara,

burgessandrew 1932Burgess, Andrew. 1932. Zanahary in south Madagascar. Minneapolis: Board of Foreign Missions.

language(s):
English
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Religion,
History,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy),
Southern,
Bara,

congregationdelamissionlazaristes 1996Congrégation de la mission (Lazaristes) (ed.) 1996. Le Christianisme dans le sud de Madagascar. Mélanges à l'occassion du centenaire de la reprise de l'évangélisation du sud de Madagascar par la congrégation de la mission (lazaristes) 1896-1996. Fianarantsoa: Editions Ambozontany.

language(s):
French, Malagasy
topic(s):
Missiology,
Religion,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Vezo,
Western,
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy),
Southern,
Mahafale (Mahafaly),
Karimbola (Karembola),
Bara,
Tesaka (Antesaka, Antaisaka),
Eastern,
Temoro (Antemoro, Antaimoro),

This work gives an up-to-date review of the history of Christianity in the South of Madagascar. One chapter that is particularly relevant to a study of the Tandroy was written by P. Benolo François, entitled: La religion traditionnelle chez les Ntandroy. He describes in detail the content and meaning of Tandroy traditional religion.
There is also a chapter on the history of the Lutheran missions in the South, from 1887 till 1950, written by Rev. James B. Vigen., and many other chapters relating to the history of the different Catholic congregations working in Madagascar.
In the chapter entitled Le Diocèse d'Ihosy, P. Colombi Giovanni Luigi, and P. Razafimamonjy Etienne Emmanuel briefly discuss the evangelisation of the Bara. Areas of Ibara are included in the diocese of Morombe on which P. Rabemanantsoa Benjamin wrote the chapter Le Diocèse de Morombe: les Lazaristes et la première évangélisation d'Ankazoabo-Sud.
The last chapter, entitled Bilan du Christianisme dans le Sud de Madagascar, by Mgr Rakotondravahatra, Jean-Guy, places the current state of Christianity in the South of Madagascar in a challenging context.

dezjacques 1978bDez, Jacques. 1978b. Les sources Européennes anciennes de la linguistique malgache. Paris: Université de Paris 7.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Malagasy language,
Linguistics,
Diachronic linguistics,
Austronesian linguistics,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Austronesian,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Sakalava,
Western,
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy),
Southern,
Merina,
Central,
Saint Mariens,
Eastern,
Betsimisaraka,

Dez gives an insightful overview and appreciation of older European sources on the Malagasy language, sorted under nationality of author; He situates each author in historical context.

Selected quotes:

  • A ce jour, l'intérêt offert par l'étude des sources anciennes n'est nullement épuis. Il demeure, au contraire, d'une extrême actualité. (27)

fagerengemile 1981Fagereng, Emile. 1981. Origine des dynasties ayant régné dans le sud et l'ouest de Madagascar. Omaly sy Anio (Hier et Aujourd'hui) 13-14:125-140.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Malagasy language,
Linguistics,
Sociolinguistics,
Diachronic linguistics,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Austronesian,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Sakalava,
Western,
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy),
Southern,
Mahafale (Mahafaly),
Bara,
Tanala (Antanala),
Eastern,

A very sketchy paper, difficult to follow, recounting the traditional origins of four Southern dynasties, all of whom claim "vazaha" ancestry.

jullyantony 1901Jully, Antony. 1901. Manuel des dialectes malgaches. Comprenant sept dialectes: Hova, Betsileo, Tankarana, Betsimisaraka, Taimorona, Tanôsy, Sakalava (mahafaly) et le Soahély. Paris: Librairie Africaine et Coloniale.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Malagasy language,
Linguistics,
Applied linguistics,
Swahili,
Indian Ocean region,
Madagascar,
History,
Austronesian,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Hova,
Merina,
Central,
Sakalava,
Western,
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Mahafale (Mahafaly),
Southern,
Betsileo,
Tankarana (Antankarana, Tekarana, Antekarana),
Northern,
Temoro (Antemoro, Antaimoro),
Eastern,
Betsimisaraka,

lintonralph 1928Linton, Ralph. 1928. Culture areas in Madagascar. American Anthropologist 30(3):363-390.

language(s):
English
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Social sciences - other,
History,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Sakalava,
Western,
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Tsimihety,
Northern,
Betsimisaraka,
Eastern,

There has been much back-and-forth about uniformity in Madagascar, and as can be seen from this article, from the earliest times. Linton points out that there are "three fairly well-marked culture areas in Madagascar, with the usual marginal tribes of mixed culture (.) which agree in a general way with the main geographic and climatic divisions of the island" (363).
He draws comparisons among three main areas of Madagascar, namely 1. the East Coast, which to the North includes the Betsimisaraka and to the South a "number of small tribes commonly, but incorrectly, grouped under the term Antaimorona" (363); 2. the "Plateaux, occupied by the Betsileo, Imerina (commonly called Hova) and Sihanaka," and 3. the "West Coast and Extreme South, occupied by the Sakalava, Mahafaly, Antandroy, and Bara."
The Tanala and Bezanozano tribes are intermediate in culture between areas 1 and 2, while the Tsimahety and Antankarana in the extreme north and the Tanôsy in the southeast seem to be intermediary between areas 1 and 3" (365).
The most interesting phenomenon of this article is the division into three areas, later taken up by linguists in connection with language. Linton makes no mention of language in this article, nor does he indicate his sources for postulating the three areas or the anthropological data he proposes. Other notable points are his sorting of a number of groups under the term "Sakalava" without specifying which, as well as the spelling of Tsimahety and the omission of the Tanôsy migration towards the Onilahy.
His argument is for cultural diversity in Madagascar, uniformity seemingly an assumption of his time, but he argues the point using terms like "tribe," "gens" and "gentes," indicative of the longstanding confusion concerning Malagasy cultures.
The main fault of this historical work is the lack of references: one does not know where the author got his information from. Researchers in Madagascar often present their specific area of research as representative of Malagasy culture as a whole. Linton was aware of this problem.

muntheludvig&rajaonarisonelie&ranaivosoadesire 1987Munthe, Ludvig, Elie Rajaonarison, and Désiré Ranaivosoa. 1987. Le catéchisme malgache de 1657. Antananarivo: Egede Instituttet.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Missiology,
Religion,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

peslenicolas 1986Pesle, Nicolas. 1986. Belamoty: Village Tanôsy de l'Onilahy (madagascar). Tulear: CEDRATOM.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Social sciences - other,
History,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

radimilahychantal 1981Radimilahy, Chantal. 1981. Migrations anciennes dans l'Androy. Omaly sy Anio (Hier et Aujourd'hui) 13-14:99-111.

language(s):
English
topic(s):
Malagasy language,
Linguistics,
Diachronic linguistics,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Austronesian,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy),
Southern,
Tanala (Antanala),
Eastern,

This paper contains much historical detail and information on Androy and its people, clans, migrations, and history. Archaeological discoveries during the latter half of the 1970's indicate that the area was inhabited since the tenth to eleventh centuries, by people with a particular culture.
The researchers were able to find precise information on two groups of Antandroy, namely the Andriamanary and the Afomarolahy - the first consisting of Andriamanary plus thirteen other groups, the second consisting of ten groups. For the rest, their list was already quite substantial for names of clans and sub-clans, but still incomplete. They obtained the information from mpisorona, i.e. the guardians of the hazomanga, since each different group identifies with their own hazomanga.
From what the researchers were told, all of these groups of Tandroy came from elsewhere, the unwritten memory dating migration to around the beginning of the 19th century, but the genealogies given pointing to the second half of the 17th century, when these migrations would have pushed the tompontany towards the North. Most groups presently living in the North and interior of Androy affirm their southern and south-eastern origin: Ranopiso-Fort Dauphin; some (the Tebekitro) say they came from the Midongy; others (the Antesomahy) from Betsileo. The inhabitants these migrants found were Tsihenimbalala, Bara and Tanala. (The Bara at a later date than the others). Some groups remained living in the area, but regrouped somewhere else, as in the case the author mentions of the Tanala of Antanandava-Ambiromena, who consider themselves Tandroy, but have kept their cultural identity.
The author mentions that the reasons for these migrations remain obscure, but that sometimes these were sociopsychological, where the people were fleeing evil spirits which are mentioned in traditions and ritual songs, such as the myths of the fanany (multi-headed serpent) and the kokolampo (a bad spirit which persecutes the people).
According to informants, the migrations were meant to be temporary, but circumstances forced them to establish themselves in the new areas, other than their place of origin. They retain a symbolical relationship through rites and customs, which, continues to influence them, even to the point that it produces in them an inner conflict between the desire to return to their land of origin and being forced to remain on "foreign" soil.
The sources of information for this study were mainly of an oral nature, undergirded in some instances by archaeological evidence, but the author stresses that written sources on ancient migrations are mostly insufficient or non-existing.

Selected quotes:

  • A l'heure actuelle, le pays antandroy forme un quadrilatère limité à l'ouest par le fleuve Menarandra, à l'est par une ligne partant de Tsivory vers Tranomaro et Ranopiso. La ligne passant par les villes Bekily-Beraketa-Tsivory constitue la limite nord.
    Les Antandroy divisés en de nombreux clans et sous-clans dont le nom est lié à l'histoire de l'entité, se regroupent selon trois grandes régions:
    -les Tahandrefa (à l'Ouest du Manambovo);
    -les Reneve (à l'Est du Manambavo);
    -les Tatimo (au sud) (100).
  • Les Andriamanary comprennent les Andriamanary à proprement parler, et 13 autres groupes: Tefanomboke, Tekonda, Tebelampy, Telanja, Temangaike (qui se divisent en deux: les Temangaikefoty et les Temangaikemainte), Tandavake, Terano, Telane, Tehelakelake, Tanandapary, Tsitaila, Tambanekile, Temaromena.
    Quant aux Afomarolahy, nous avons décompté 10 groupes: Antemafe, Zazafoty, Takobo, Temarokobo, Tsibontsoa, Tafakatse, Afondriatehake, Tezantelo, Tandaza.
    A part ces deux groupes, nous allons nous contenter de donner une liste des autres clans ou sous-clans avec, si possible, la région où ils sont installés. Nous espérons que des renseignements sur leurs subdivisions internes nous seront bientôt fournis. Ce sont:
    -dans la région d'Antanimora: les Tanalave, Afondriambata, Afomihala, Tananilahy, Tedoho, Tantsaha, Temafy;
    -dans le nord du pays: les antesomahy, Antedodo, Tandemby, Tafondratôke, Tefanoroke, Zafindravola, Tambanditse, Tsihenimbalala, Temanasa, Zafindratsiloke;
    -dans la région d'Ambovombe: les Tesevohitse, Tamparehitsy, Tezaha, Lamitihy, Teampoly, Temalaky, Sihanamena, Tanandrove, Tetsila, Temahatomotsy, Tezaha, Tetsimanato, Tambahy, Temarosiha, Tambotake, Tesampona, Temaroaloka, Tambaninato.
    Par ailleurs, un certain nombre de noms de groupes antandroy nous ont été cités sans que l'on ait pu nous indiquer leur localisation. Ce sont: les Tambolovohitra, Tambonitratroke, Tsimihina, Tebefeno, Sanameloke, Tampototse, Tebekitro, Sanamahie, Takitre, Antevahy, Anteady, Antekibo, Tandringy, Tampany, Antevato, Antandramenatse, Lavaheloke, Manitsine, Marolabo, Tsitemanindry, Fenovahoaka, Tambato, Tsihatrika, Tambohitse, Tanantampohitse, Zatomotry, Antesatry, Maroakalo, Befangitse, Hazoangatse, Sanamaka, Antetsimena, Mahaitampoe, Tevahe, Tevondro, Namotoa, Tamonto, Tambahy, Tesonona, Talomborona, Tambinany, Teafo, Tevahazo, Tananfindravoay, Tamboroho, Tsimanata, Tanalavondrove, Afondraosa, Afondralambo, Afondrasiloke, Anasosa, Milahea, Tsirangoto, Tanjeke, Tezano, Tsimihina, Tsirandrany, Tanatampoty, Antsesatry, Antekibo, Zatoafo.
    Ces différents groupes se reconnaissent à leur hazomanga-D'ailleurs, ces renseignements nous ont été donnés par les mpisorona, gardiens de hazomanga (101).
  • Ces différents groupes se reconnaissent à leur 'hazomanga' (101).
  • En plus, les traditionnistes disparaissent petit à petit et sont plus ou moins remplacés par des successeurs qui, à l'heure actuelle, nous communiquent ou interprètent les traditions selon leurs options politiques ou selon ce qu'ils pensent et croient être la nôtre (101).
  • Bien sûr, les Antandroy ou ceux qui habitent la région comme tous les autres Malgaches sont hospitaliers mais nous discernons quand même une certaine méfiaance vis-à-vis de nous qui ne faisons que passer et prétendons leur soutirer des informations concernant l'histoire de leur groupe, informations dont, somme toute, l'utilisation les laisse sceptiques (101).
  • En dernier lieu, insistons sur le caractère précieux mais relatif des données orales dont la crédibilité ne sera vérifiée que quand elles seront confrontées avec d'autres données, ou quand on sera certain des modes d'interprétation qui lui conviennent (101).
  • Les premiers occupants 'tompon-tany' de la région que ces groupes auraient trouvés seraient les Tsihenimbalala, les Bara, et les Tanala. Le refoulement de ces derniers vers le nord est chose certaine, car les traces de leur occupation sont attestées autant dans les traditions que par la présence de tombes anciennes.
    Il semble que les Bara soient venus après les Tsihenimbalala. En effet, en ce qui concerne la culture matérielle et en se basant sur les traditions orales, la présence des Bara semblerait bien plus proche des temps actuels.
    D'autres groupes considérés comme les premiers occupants par les Tandroy 'nouvellement' installés, vivent encore dans la région bien qu'ils aient été aussi refoulés par ces mêmes Tandroy et soient cantonnés dans certains villages. C'est le cas par exemple dans le Nord des Tanala regroupés dans le village d'Antanandava-Ambiromena. Ils se considèrent comme Tandroy mais gardent toutefois leur 'identité' culturelle.
    Ces mouvements de population auraient obéi à une loi de groupe et ne prennent jamais un aspect individuel.
    Les affirmations des Tandroy Tebekitro de Marovaho nous font savoir qu'ils ne sont pas d'origine Tanôsy mais que deux groupes ayant vécu ensemble ont quitté à peu près à la même époque la région de l'Anosy.
    Les groupes se sont déplacés en masse poussés par des raisons qui nous restent encore obscures.
    Les raisons évoquées sont souvent économiques, mais nous nous rendons compte qu'elles sont récentes. Quelquefois elles sont d'ordre socio-psychologique: fuir des esprits malveillants. Ainsi, nous en trouvons la trace dans les traditions et dans les cantiques: le mythe du 'fanany' (serpent à plusieurs têtes) et le mythe du 'kokolampo', un esprit maléfique qui persécute les populations (103).
  • Les résultats actuels montrent alors que l'intérieur et surtout la partie nord de l'Androy forme une zone de convergence de divers groupes ethniques: autrefois Tandroy, Bara, Tanôsy surtout, actuellement Betsileo et également Merina. Quoi qu'il en soit, la prédominance antandroy est chose évidente (103).
  • Au début, il semble que les migrants aient conçu leurs déplacements comme essentiellement temporaires. Mais les faits les ont obligés à s'établir loin de leur pays d'origine. Ce cas est vraiment indéniable pour le groupe des Antesomahy. Leur itinéraire forme une boucle. D'aiileurs, la tradition affirme qu'ils ont voulu revenir dans leur pays d'origine (les Hauts-plateaux). Ce désir n'a pu être satisfait. Serait-ce le même cas qui se serait produit pour les autres groupes? En effet, on ressent comme un déchirement chez les groupes, déchirement entre le désir toujours entretenu de revenir dans le pays d'origine et l'obligation de demeurer sur une terre "étrangère," entre la fidélité aux sources et les contraintes du pays natal.
    Le pays d'origine continue de rester, même symboliquement, en relation avec la terre d'origine. Toutefois, le fait de ne pouvoir ramener les parents et d'enterrer sur place rattachent à la terre d'immigration.
    L'"identité" est donc maintenue. C'est le cas des Tebekitro de Marovaho qui considèrent la terre où ils sont comme la leur, bien qu'ils avouent ne pas en être originaires.
    La persistance, le souvenir des coutumes et l'absence de relations autres que symboliques avec la terre d'origine ou les membres de la grande famille, nous laissent supposer que les migrations donc se sont effectuées depuis une époque très lointaine( 104-5).
  • Toutes les informations disent en effet que seuls les Tanôsy-Tatsimo savent forger depuis longtemps. D'autres moins sûres en attribuent la connaissance aux Tanala et aux Bara. Le groupe des Tebekitro de Marovaho reste alors un énigme. Ils se disent forgerons deouis leurs ancêtres. Ils viennent d'Anosy mais ne seraient pas Tanôsy. Leurs affirmations peuvent-elles être retenues? (105).
  • Les recherches sont donc à pousser du côté des Bara ou des Tsihenimbalala qui auraient autrefois peuplé l'Androy (105).
  • Le groupe des Temaroalaka d'Ambovombe nous posent un problème dont la situation peut nous aider à comprendre les autres groupes. En effet, ce groupe est antandroy par le parler mais Tanôsy par les us et coutumes. Et pourtant il se considère antandroy. Les données sociologiques et ethnographiques pourraient alors peut-être nous aider (106).
  • Le contacte entre les Antandroy nouveaux-venus et les groupes 'tompon-tany' qui s'est d'abord manifesté d'une manière violente, belliqueuse par affrontements, puis ensuite par un ralliement des anciens occupants, laissent supposer que les Tandroy avaient une organisation de groupe cohérente et solide par rapport à leurs adversaires.
    A l'heure actuelle, le groupe antandroy constitue un des groupes migrateurs les plus actifs. Avec les gens du Sud-Est, ils forment la majorité des travailleurs dans les régions de l'île qui demandent beaucoup de main-d'ouvre comme, par exemple, dans les plantations et les sucreries du Nord-Ouest de l'île.
    Ces migrations temporaires, une dizaine d'années tout au plus, peuvent prendre différents aspects: soit individuels, soit familiaux, soit claniques.
    La principale cause en est la recherche de l'argent qui permettra de regrouper un important troupeau de zébus lors du retour au pays, qui permettra aussi d'avoir du prestige et ainsi de construire des tombeaux grandioses. Il faut aussi noter l'existence des migrations plus durables, migrations qui concernent des groupes entiers de Tandroy qui ont voulu peut-être revenir au pays d'origine mais n'en ont pas eu la possibilité.
    Le genre de vie pour ces derniers peut changer de visage. De nomades, ces Antandroy sont devenu sédentaires. C'est le cas d'un groupe de Tandroy regroupés dans un village dans la région de Belo-sur-Tsiribihina et qui sont devenus riziculteurs (106).

raharinjanaharysolo&mahajobom&vaovolodimby 1988Raharinjanahary, Solo, M. Mahajobo, and Dimby Vaovolo. 1988. Une enquête lexicostatistique sur les parlers Tanôsy et Tañalaña de l'Onilahy. In Linguistique de Madagascar et des Comores. Etudes Océan Indien 9, 171-183, edited by Pierre Vérin. Paris: Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Dialectology,
Linguistics,
Malagasy language,
Sociolinguistics,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Research,
History,
Austronesian,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tañalaña,
South-western,
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

raharinjanaharysolo 1992Raharinjanahary, Solo. 1992. L'AnTanôsy: Parler témoin de l'histoire de la langue malgache. In Le scribe et la grande maison. Etudes Océan Indien 15, 49-58, edited by Pierre Vérin. Paris: Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Malagasy language,
Linguistics,
Sociolinguistics,
Diachronic linguistics,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Austronesian,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

richardsonjames 1878Richardson, James. 1878. Ny Bara sy ny Tanôsy. Tananarive: London Missionary Society Press.

language(s):
Malagasy
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Bara,
Southern,

samboclement 1993Sambo, Clément. 1993. Destins astrologiques et liberté Humaine. In Religions. Etudes Océan Indien 16, 1-29, edited by Pierre Vérin. Paris: Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

In this article, the author restates and summarises elements of ritual astrological practice among the Tanôsy people, previously discussed in his master's paper, accepted in 1983 at the University of Tulear. His study is the fruit of research in the area of Fort Dauphin (southeast Madagascar) entitled, "Aspects philosophiques du Fanandroana anTanôsy." The practice of astrology came to Madagascar with Islam and has become part of the Malagasy view of life. At birth, a destiny is assigned to the person, expressed as a name chosen by the ombiasa according to an astrological calendar. There are twelve names for boys and twelve names for girls. Other names are given to each person to ensure identification, as more than one person in the family could be born under the same sign.
The author mentions some interesting facts on the world view of the Tanôsy people.

Selected quotes:

  • Ce qui importe chez les Tanôsy ce n'est pas la pratique astrologique en tant que science pure mais en tant que pratique rituelle. C'est un rite par lequel le Tanôsy se manifeste comme étant en un sens maître des destins astrologiques mais non victime (1).
  • Lorsqu'un enfant est grondé par ses parents, la coutume veut qu'il garde silence. Le silence est alors une attitude de réception et de disponibilité.
    Sur le plan humain, la parole est signe de vie. L'abcense de la parole équivaut à la mort (3).
  • Dans la société Tanôsy, les femmes sont comptées parmi les enfants. Lorsqu'on dit 'apela amin-jaza', 'femmes et enfants', on place la femme au bas de la hiérarchie du groupe. Elle n'est même pas digne de participer ni d'assister à certaines cérémonies rituelles, surtout si elle a ses règles, car les règles symbolisent l'infécondité, la mort (3).
  • Le bouf est l'animal de sacrifice par excellence. A défaut, on sacrifice un mouton ou un poulet, mais jamais un chèvre ou une oie. Le bouf est aussi le signe visible de la richesse (5).
  • Le bouf tué équivaut à l'argent rituel (.) (5).
  • Un bouc doit mourir car c'est un ennemi.
    Les Tanôsy ne mangent pas de la viande de chèvre, cet animal constitut pour eux le tabou alimentaire. En tant que tel, elle symbolise le mal. Le mal suprême c'est celui qui porte atteinte à notre vie: la mort. L'ennemi représente une mort suspendue. Tuer l'ennemi, c'est éliminer le mal. C'est en quelque sorte le bouc émissaire que les juifs lâchaient dans le désert (.) (5).
  • Le moteur qui pousse les Tanôsy à accomplir tout acte rituel c'est la crainte de la mort (6).
  • L'oie symbolise la pureté, la noblesse. Les Tanôsy pensent que les oies ne se nourissent pas d'excrments humains, même si par hasard elles mettaient leurs pattes dessus, elles boiteraient, à la différence des poules qui, elles s'en régalent. De ce fait, l'oie est considérée comme l'oiseau noble (9).
  • Dans les rites funéraires, le bouf remplace le défunt. Selon certaines traditions, il paraît qu'autrefois quand une personne était morte, on ne l'enterrait pas, on la mangeait. De ce fait, on croyait que la vie n'est pas dissoute mais transmise à ceux qui l'ont mangée, à ses parents. Plus tard, au lieu de manger le défunt, on tua un bouf à sa place. Et puisqu'il ne faut pas manger la personne morte elle-même, pourquoi encore manger son substitut? C'est pourquoi, bon nombre de clans Tanôsy ne mangent pas les boufs tués à l'occasion des funérailles (9).
  • (.) tout le monde est assis sauf l'officiant, (.) La position assise est signe d'humilité, d'abaissement. Les Malgaches ne parlent jamais debout devant quelqu'un de respectable. La position debout signifie la domination, le mépris, c'est le cas de l'officiant car il a le pouvoir de chasser le mauvais sort et de dialoguer avec les puissances surnaturelles (14).
  • L'astrologie tanôsy est plutôt une voie religieuse qu'une science exacte comme les mathématiques (.). Néanmoins le Tanôsy n'est pas fataliste. Si tout va bien, comme cela est prévu par le devin, on croit à l'efficacité des influences du destin. Si rien ne va, les déterminations se limitent seulement à une prédisposition naturelle (16).
  • Malgré le destin, l'homme reste libre et responsable de ses actes. Les qualités du destin restent toujours dans la personne et non dans le destin lui-même. C'est pourquoi, le destin ne suffit pas à expliquer les actes humains, et les influences déterminantes du destin n'apaisent pas la conscience quand la personne a commis un acte déplorable. L'homme reste, quel que soit le cas, maiître de son destin, il suffit d'en prendre conscience. Le destinest flexible à volonté, la liberté humaine triomphe sur les prétendues déterminations extérieures comme les influences astrologiques (17).

simonpierre 1988Simon, Pierre. 1988. Ludvig Munthe, Elie Rajaonarison, Désiré Ranaivosoa, "Le cathéchisme malgache de 1657, essai de présentation du premier livre en langue malgache." Egede Instituttet, Imprimerie Luthérienne, Antananarivo, 1987. In Linguistique de Madagascar et des Comores. Etudes Océan Indien 9, 254-256, edited by Pierre Vérin. Paris: Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Missiology,
Religion,
Dialectology,
Linguistics,
Malagasy language,
Sociolinguistics,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Austronesian,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

verinpierre&heurtebizegeorges 1974Vérin, Pierre, and Georges Heurtebize. 1974. La tranovato de l'Anosy: Première construction érigée par des Européens à Madagascar. Taloha 6:117-142.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
History,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,

wuestefeldmarzella 2001Wüstefeld, Marzella. 2001. Quelques aspects de sécurité alimentaire dans le sud de Madagascar. Antananarivo: Tsipika.

language(s):
French
topic(s):
Qualitative research,
Research,
Madagascar,
Indian Ocean region,
Social sciences - other,
Anthropology and ethnology,
Malagasy ethnie(s):
Fareze (Tefareze, Antanosy Tefareze, "Tambolo"),
Tanosy (Antanosy),
South-eastern,
Zafimarozaha,
Bara,
Southern,
Tandroy (Antandroy, Ntandroy),

This report of a survey on food security contains much useful information concerning the social realities of the Bekily region. It has been written with compassion and the research yielded, judging by the care taken with design and method, a reliable synchronic picture of the situation in 1997 in the south.