Chamicuro data: laryngeal consonants

Datos del chamicuro: consonantes laríngeas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steve Parker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics,

University of North Dakota,

and SIL International

 


SIL Language and Culture Documentation and Description
8

 

©2010 Steve Parker, and SIL International
ISSN 1939-0785

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fair Use Policy

Documents published in the Language and Culture Documentation and Description series are intended for scholarly research and educational use.

You may make copies of these publications for research or instructional purposes (under fair use guidelines) free of charge and without further permission. Republication or commercial use of Language and Culture Documentation and Description or the documents contained therein is

expressly prohibited without the written consent of the copyright

holder(s).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Series Editor

George Huttar

 

Copy Editors

Betty Philpott

Mary Ruth Wise

 

Compositor

Judy Benjamin

 


Abstract

 

In this paper I present a 513-item wordlist that illustrates the occurrence of the phonemes /h/ and /ʔ/ in Chamicuro, an extinct Arawakan language of Peru. Both the instructions (metadata) and the glosses for the actual linguistic forms are given in Spanish as well as in English.

 

 


Introduction

 

In this article I present a 513-item wordlist that illustrates the occurrence of the phonemes /h/ and /ʔ/ in the Chamicuro language of Peru. This introductory section of the paper describes the following Chamicuro data, including the purpose of presenting them in this way at this time, and metadata explaining the circumstances surrounding their collection. After these instructions are given in English, a corresponding Spanish translation is also included. The following fonts are used in this article: in the original Word document from which this file was created, I use the default Times New Roman font for the prose explanations in this introductory section; for all of the phonetically transcribed Chamicuro data forms, on the other hand, I use the Doulos SIL unicode-compliant font. The latter can be downloaded for free from the SIL International website.

 

What is Chamicuro, and where was it spoken?

 

Chamicuro is a Maipuran Arawakan language formerly spoken in and around the lowland Amazonian village of Pampa Hermosa, Peru, on the eastern bank of the lower Huallaga River, downstream (north) from Yurimaguas and upstream (south) from Lagunas. The approximate GPS coordinates for Pampa Hermosa are S5°24'55" and W75°48'41". The village is located about 65 miles north–northeast of Yurimaguas, near a lake called Achual Tipishca, in the department of Loreto. The ISO 639-3 code for Chamicuro is ccc. The endonym (autodenomination) of the language group is [čąmekód͡lo]. The population of ethnic Chamicuros currently living in Pampa Hermosa, i.e., the number of descendents of native speakers, is estimated to be between ten and twenty persons (Pozzi-Escot 1998, Adelaar 2000, Lewis 2009). The main speaker from whom I collected data on the Chamicuro language (see the section on Who provided these data?) reported that many of the Chamicuros had been carried off to Brazil to work as slaves on rubber plantations during colonial times (cf. Parker 1987).

 

What is the purpose of these data?

 

There are two main purposes for presenting these data in electronic format: (1) to document more fully what we know about the Chamicuro language by sharing them with the world, and (2) having arranged them into logical columns, it is hoped that they might be useful as a somewhat basic practical exercise on phonemic analysis in a typical linguistics course. For this reason I intentionally include only a minimal amount of formal phonological analysis in this document. Readers who are curious about how these data might best be analyzed should consult the bibliography items listed at the end of this file (after the wordlist), especially my 1988 MA thesis and the corresponding 1991 book, as well as my 2001 article. They are also welcome to contact me (Steve Parker) in person.

 

Why are these data important?

 

A big and important issue in the current linguistic world is language documentation, especially with respect to languages that are endangered, moribund, etc. (Himmelmann 1998). Since Chamicuro may in fact already be extinct, it is urgent to make available as much data on the language as possible. The Associated Press published an article on language death in the New York Times in 1999, focusing on Chamicuro, and reported that at that time there was only one native speaker still alive. This scenario serves as the historical background for the present work. Although quite a bit of formal analysis of Chamicuro grammar and phonology has been published, some of the data have been sitting in my unpublished field notes until now, so it is important to share them with the world in this electronic format. Before I left Peru in 1996, one of my SIL colleagues there photocopied most of my handwritten Chamicuro data and archived them with the Biblioteca Nacional and Ministerio de Educación of Peru. See Parker (1985a, 1985b, and 1985c) in the bibliography list at the end of this paper for more details.

 

What other published materials on Chamicuro already exist?

 

In 1987 my SIL colleague David Payne used the extant Chamicuro morphological data to demonstrate that it is a mainstream Arawakan language. Later, in a major study involving phonological correspondences among shared lexical retentions in other Arawakan languages, he established its more precise genetic classification as Western Maipuran (Payne 1991). The language most closely related to Chamicuro, in a linguistic sense, is Yanesha’ (formerly called Amuesha). A list of all of the other previously published works on Chamicuro (to my knowledge) is given in the bibliographic references. Three of these were published by the Peru branch of SIL and are available electronically for free download from the following website:

http://www.sil.org/americas/peru/show_pubs.asp?pubs=online&code=ccc&Lang=eng.

 

Who provided these data?

 

The primary Chamicuro speaker with whom I worked was Gregorio Orbe Caro, whose Chamicuro name is Lekoli Orwe Karo. He was 75 years old in 1985. His mother was Chamicuro, but I do not recall what, if anything, he said about the ethnicity of his father. Don Gregorio, as I called him in Spanish, was a mother tongue speaker of Chamicuro, but he also spoke Spanish and San Martín Quechua fluently. His wife, who was 64 years old in 1985, was Elisa Sangama Inuma. Both of her parents were Chamicuros, and she was also a mother tongue speaker. Together Gregorio and Elisa had several children, but the latter are probably not fluent speakers of Chamicuro; I presume that all of them communicate primarily in Spanish, as do all of their peers in Pampa Hermosa. In my work on Chamicuro I was also assisted by Alfonso Patow Chota, who at the time resided in Yurimaguas. The father of Don Alfonso, Rodolfo Patow, had been the patrón in Pampa Hermosa. Alfonso is a mother tongue speaker of Spanish, but he also understands spoken Chamicuro quite well. Don Gregorio was the Chamicuro speaker who served as the source for all of the written transcriptions I made of actual Chamicuro utterances. Don Alfonso also helped with glossing the materials in Spanish, but I did not transcribe any of his pronunciations of Chamicuro speech. Both men were paid for their services. I am indebted to them for their generous collaboration and assistance in studying Chamicuro, and wish to express my appreciation here for their help.

 

When were these data collected?

 

I personally began direct fieldwork on the Chamicuro language in September 1985, under the auspices of the Summer Institute of Linguistics, now called SIL International. At that time I worked with Gregorio and Alfonso for about one month. In 1987 I contacted them again and worked with them for several more weeks. My third and last period of elicitation was in November 1993, for just a few days.

 

Where were these data collected?

 

The sessions in 1985 and 1987 took place at the SIL center in Yarinacocha, Pucallpa, Peru. In 1993, on the other hand, I worked with Gregorio and Alfonso on location, first in Pampa Hermosa, then in Yurimaguas.

 

What kind of data were collected?

 

The total corpus of Chamicuro data I collected consists of over 1000 individual lexical items, seven texts (stories) of different genres, and extensive morphosyntactic paradigms. The former served as the primary basis for the data forms presented here. Unfortunately, as far as I am aware, no audio or video recordings of actual Chamicuro speech exist.

 

How were these data elicited?

 

In eliciting most of these materials I prompted Gregorio by pronouncing a word or phrase in Spanish, which he then translated and pronounced in Chamicuro. Alfonso helped us by ensuring that the Chamicuro utterances were the best equivalents of the corresponding Spanish expressions.

 

How are these data transcribed?

 

Immediately after Gregorio pronounced each Chamicuro word or phrase (in 1985), I wrote down both utterances (Chamicuro and Spanish) on paper, using the Americanist phonetic alphabet for the Chamicuro expressions. During the sessions in 1987 and 1993, on the other hand, I used a combination of this same phonetic alphabet and a practical phonemic orthography which I had developed in the meantime for publishing books containing Chamicuro data. In the data forms presented here I likewise use the Americanist system of phonetic transcription since that is how most of the work on Chamicuro has been published. I now list and define a few of the more unusual phonetic symbols used in the Chamicuro data later in this paper, including some of their standard equivalents in the IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet).

 

[a] = [ɑ] = low, central, unrounded vowel

[š] = [ʃ] = voiceless alveopalatal fricative

[ṣ̌] = voiceless retroflexed alveopalatal fricative

[š̯] = voiceless laminal alveolar fricative, an allophone of /š/ before the vowel /i/

[š̯y] = voiceless palatalized laminal alveolar fricative, an allophone of /š/ before the vowel /e/

[ts] = [t͡s] = voiceless alveolar affricate

[č] = [t͡ʃ] = voiceless alveopalatal affricate

[č̣] = [t͡ṣ̌] = voiceless retroflexed alveopalatal affricate

[ƚ] = voiceless alveolar lateral fricative, a syllable-final allophone of /l/

[d͡l] = voiced alveolar lateral affricate, an optional allophone of /l/ between vowels

[ly] = [ʎ] = voiced (alveo)palatal lateral (approximant)

[Ė] = voiced alveopalatal nasal

[y] = [j] = voiced palatal glide or approximant

[ř] = [ɾ] = voiced alveolar tap or flap (in loanwords)

[ɩ] = [ɪ] = high, front, lax, unrounded vowel, an allophone of /i/ in certain closed syllables

[] = [ć] = voiceless palatal fricative, an optional allophone of /h/ following the vowel /i/

[W] = [] = voiceless labial-velar glide (approximant), a syllable-final allophone of /w/ and /h/

[Y] = [] = voiceless palatal glide (approximant), a syllable-final allophone of /y/

(i) = an abstract underlying vowel posited for phonological reasons, which is deleted in

        surface forms

[a] = an optional, non-phonemic, non-syllabic echo vowel (svarabhakti)

[ę] = a nasalized vowel

[V:] = [] = contrastively lengthened (bimoraic) vowels

[] = vowels bearing primary stress

[] = vowels bearing secondary stress

~ = free variation

 

What do these data mean?

 

The English and Spanish glosses appearing in the data table below give the basic meaning of each lexical item. A few of the Spanish terms may be specific to the dialect spoken in the jungle of Peru, such as #155, majás (‘paca rodent’). In addition, the following abbreviations are used:

 

adj       adjective

esp.      especie (Spanish for ‘species’)

f           feminine

lit.        literally

m         masculine

n          noun

Q         Quechua

S          Spanish

sp.       species

tr          transitive

v          verb

v.         vide (‘see’)

 

The abbreviation tr indicates a verb which ends with the transitivizing suffix /-ne/. For example, item #366, /umuʔmekne/, could be translated ‘I bring something’.

 

How are these data arranged?

 

The first (leftmost) column presents the Chamicuro words using a phonemic level of transcription. This is followed (next to the right) by a phonetic transcription, then the orthographic transcription (described previously under the heading How are these data transcribed?), then an English gloss, and finally a Spanish gloss. As far as the vertical,
top-to-bottom (numbered) dimension is concerned, the words are alphabetized according to the Chamicuro phonemic segments and their corresponding orthographic spelling, following the conventions in my 1987 and 1994a books. These, in turn, are generally consistent with Spanish alphabetization rules as well.

 

What kind of data are presented in this paper?

 

The list of Chamicuro words was chosen to illustrate the laryngeal consonants /h/ and /ʔ/. Consequently, each lexical item in this data set contains one or more occurrences of the phonetic variants of these consonantal phonemes. See my 2001 article for a formal analysis and discussion of the theoretical significance of these segments, especially with respect to their phonological distribution in this language.

 

How accurate and reliable are these data?

 

Unlike the typical SIL field program, my work eliciting Chamicuro data took place during relatively short periods of time, and with only one native speaker. Consequently, given these limitations I did not enjoy the benefits of testing my analysis and hypotheses in multiple settings over many years with numerous speakers. Therefore, I hesitate to consider these transcriptions and glosses to be absolutely conclusive, unlike those in a dictionary and/or reference grammar which represents the accumulated knowledge of several decades of in-depth fieldwork. Nevertheless, during my three sessions of contact with the Chamicuro speakers, I did have occasion to recheck much of my data — for example, in the context of isolated wordlists vs. morphophonemic paradigms vs. spontaneous texts. As a result, we can be confident that the majority of the Chamicuro forms presented here are accurate to a large degree. In those cases when I do still have doubts about the correct transcription and/or glossing, I try to indicate this by noting fluctuating pronunciations (free variation), alternative meanings, etc. In the long run it is certainly better to share the data that I do have, with appropriate caveats, than to not publish any of them at all.

 

How complete and exhaustive are these data?

 

The list of 513 data forms appearing at the end of this document constitutes the entire set of unique, individual Chamicuro words elicited to date that contain the glottal phonemes /h/ and/or /ʔ/ (see the previous section entitled What kind of data are presented in this paper?). These in turn are taken from a more exhaustive list of about 1031 items (see the following section on What other Chamicuro data are also available on this same website?). Consequently, we can conclude that approximately 50 percent of all Chamicuro words contain a laryngeal consonant phoneme (in this sample). Nevertheless, as indicated in the previous paragraph (How accurate and reliable are these data?), I may have intentionally left out of this paper a few Chamicuro forms potentially containing an /h/ or /ʔ/ due to uncertainty on my part about their correct transcription and/or glossing. Furthermore, some of the words were collected during my last two elicitation sessions (1987 and 1993), and were therefore transcribed with the practical phonemic orthography rather than phonetically (see How are these data transcribed?). As a result, the optional syllable-final voiceless palatal fricative allophone ([]) was not always differentiated in my data notes from the basic underlying form [h]. Rather, both types of surface segments were usually spelled in the same way, with just the letter “j” (in 1987 and 1993). This was a conscious decision on my part, and was motivated by my desire to write down the Chamicuro expressions as quickly and easily as possible. Because of this, in the list below a few of the Chamicuro forms containing a coda [h] might actually be more accurately transcribed with the symbol [] instead of [h]. However, this is not a serious problem since [] and [h] are allophones of the same phoneme in Chamicuro and therefore do not contrast, i.e., they never distinguish two different words which would otherwise constitute a minimal pair. So we can rest assured that substituting syllable-final [h] for [] in these data (or vice-versa), would never have the undesired effect of changing the meaning of any of these Chamicuro lexical items.

 

What other Chamicuro data are also available on this same website?

 

In addition to this file, we also plan to post at this same venue similar documents containing the following (sub)sets of Chamicuro data: (1) a 207 item Swadesh list; (2) a list of words illustrating the three allophones of the lateral phoneme /l/; (3) a list of words borrowed from Spanish and Quechua; (4) a set of morphophonemic paradigms; and (5) a more or less exhaustive list of all of the individual Chamicuro lexical items that I collected.

 

Who can use these data?

 

With respect to informed consent on the part of the Chamicuro speakers, when I began to work with them in 1985, this was not an ethical issue that preoccupied most of the linguistic world to the degree that it does now. Consequently, I did not prepare any type of written or recorded document to formally obtain their permanent permission to disseminate the data they provided. Nevertheless, they were aware of SIL’s intention to share these with the world, although, of course, at that time the Internet obviously had not yet been invented. Furthermore, in subsequent visits to Pampa Hermosa I distributed to the speakers, their families, and the village leaders several copies of the books which we had produced by that time, and no objections on the part of any of these people were ever expressed to me. Therefore, it seems reasonable to make these data freely available to the public in this format for the purposes of academic study. As far as I am concerned these data can be printed out, copied, analyzed, and used in derivative works for non-profit purposes, provided that this document is cited as the primary source, and Mr. Gregorio Orbe Caro is acknowledged as the Chamicuro speaker who provided these forms. On May 4, 2009, the Committee which oversees human subjects research carried out by members of the Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (Dallas) granted us approval to publish this paper, as long as the disclaimers noted above are included.

 

What if I notice an apparent mistake in this file?

 

In spite of my efforts to keep these data as “clean” as possible, it is not unlikely that an error or two may have crept in somewhere. If a reader happens to spot something in this document which seems to be inconsistent or a mistake, please do not hesitate to report it to me, the author, at the following address: steve-monica_parker@sil.org.

 


Acknowledgements

 

I am grateful to the following colleagues (in alphabetical order) for their comments and suggestions on earlier drafts of this paper: Mike Cahill, Tom Headland, Ken Olson, Arden Sanders, Gary Simons, Mary Ruth Wise, and Tom Woodward. I also thank Mónica Parker (my wife) and Giuliana López for reviewing the Spanish version of these instructions and data. Also, Jim Roberts helped me determine the precise location of Pampa Hermosa on the map, i.e., its GPS coordinates.

 

Introducción

 

En este artículo se presenta una lista de 513 palabras que ilustran la pronunciación de los fonemas /h/ y /ʔ/ en el chamicuro, una lengua del Perú. En esta sección introductoria del manuscrito se describen los datos del chamicuro que se presentan a continuación. Esta descripción incluye dos partes: (1) el propósito que se tuvo al presentarlos en esta forma y (2) varios metadatos que explican las circunstancias en torno a su recopilación. Líneas arriba estas mismas instrucciones se presentan también en inglés. En este artículo se utilizan las siguientes fuentes tipográficas: en el archivo original a partir del cual se creó este documento (Word.doc), se utiliza por defecto la fuente Times New Roman para las instrucciones en esta sección introductoria. Para transcribir los datos fonológicos en chamicuro, en cambio, se utiliza la fuente Doulos SIL, la cual cumple con los requisitos del unicode. Ésta se puede bajar gratuitamente del sitio del ILV (SIL International).

 

ņQué es el chamicuro, y dónde se hablaba?

 

El chamicuro es una lengua de la familia maipuré del tronco arahuaco que anteriormente se hablaba en las cercanías del pueblo amazónico de Pampa Hermosa, Perú, en la orilla oriental del río Bajo Huallaga, abajo (al norte) de Yurimaguas y arriba (al sur) de Lagunas. Las coordenadas GPS aproximadas de Pampa Hermosa son Sur5°24'55" y Oeste75°48'41". El pueblo se ubica aproximadamente a 105 kilómetros al nor-noreste de Yurimaguas, cerca de un lago llamado Achual Tipishca, en el departamento de Loreto. El código ISO 639-3 para el chamicuro es ccc. El endónimo (autodenominación) que los hablantes mismos usaban para referirse a su propio grupo y lengua es [čąmekód͡lo]. La población de chamicuros étnicos que actualmente residen en Pampa Hermosa, es decir, la cantidad de descendientes de los hablantes nativos, se estima entre diez y viente personas (Pozzi-Escot 1998, Adelaar 2000, Lewis 2009). El hablante principal quien me proveyó estos datos de la lengua chamicuro (véase la sección ņQuién proveyó estos datos?) me informó que durante la época colonial, muchos de los chamicuros fueron llevados como esclavos a Brasil para trabajar en las plantaciones de caucho (cfr. Parker 1987).

 

ņCuál es el propósito de estos datos?

 

Hay dos razones principales para presentar estos datos en forma electrónica: (1) documentar de una manera más completa lo que sabemos acerca de la lengua chamicuro, al compartirlos con todo el mundo, y (2) al arreglarlos en columnas lógicas, esperamos que se puedan utilizar como un ejercicio básico y práctico en el análisis fonémico dentro de un curso lingüístico típico. Por este motivo de manera intencional incluyo sólo una cantidad mínima de análisis fonológico formal en este documento. Si alguien quiere profundizar en el análisis de estas expresiones, debe consultar las referencias bibliográficas que se enumeran al final de este archivo, especialmente mi tesis de maestría de 1988 y el correspondiente libro publicado en 1991, así como mi artículo que fue publicado en el aĖo 2001. También pueden comunicarse conmigo personalmente (Steve Parker).

 

ņPor qué son importantes estos datos?

 

Un tema muy importante en el mundo lingüístico actual es la documentación de los idiomas minoritarios, sobre todo los que están en peligro o ya en vías de extinción, etc. (Himmelmann 1998). Dada la probabilidad de que el chamicuro ya esté extinto, es urgente que pongamos todos nuestros datos al alcance del público tan pronto como sea posible. En 1999 la Associated Press publicó en el New York Times un artículo sobre la muerte de las lenguas, enfocándose en el chamicuro, y reportó que en ese momento existía un solo nativohablante del idioma. Esta situación sirve de trasfondo histórico a esta obra. Aunque ya se han publicado bastantes análisis formales de la gramática y la fonología del chamicuro, algunos de los datos inéditos se encuentran solamente en mis archivos personales de campo. Por lo tanto, conviene que los compartamos con el mundo en este formato electrónico. Antes de terminar mi trabajo en el Perú en 1996, uno de mis colegas allí (otro miembro del ILV) sacó fotocopias de la mayoría de mis datos sobre el chamicuro escritos a mano y archivó los mismos en la Biblioteca Nacional y el Ministerio de Educación del Perú. En la lista bibliográfica al final de este trabajo remítase a Parker 1985a, 1985b y 1985c para mayores detalles.

 

ņCuáles son los otros materiales publicados sobre el chamicuro que ya existen?

 

En 1987 uno de mis colegas del ILV, David Payne, utilizó los datos morfológicos existentes del chamicuro para demostrar el hecho de que es una lengua arahuaca prototípica. Luego realizó un estudio profundo acerca de las correspondencias fonológicas entre el léxico común de varios otros idiomas arahuacos y estableció que el chamicuro pertenece más precisamente a la rama occidental del maipuré (Payne 1991). La lengua más cercana al chamicuro, en términos lingüísticos, es el yanesha’ (que anteriormente se llamaba amuesha). Al final de este archivo se presenta una lista de todas las demás obras previamente publicadas sobre el chamicuro (según mi entender). Tres de estos libros se publicaron bajo los auspicios del ILV en el Perú, y se pueden bajar gratuitamente en forma electrónica del siguiente sitio de Internet: http://www.sil.org/americas/peru/show_pubs.asp?pubs=online&code=ccc&Lang=spa.

 

ņQuién proveyó estos datos?

 

El hablante chamicuro quien principalmente me ayudó en este trabajo fue el seĖor Gregorio Orbe Caro. Su nombre chamicuro es Lekoli Orwe Karo. En el aĖo 1985 tenía 75 aĖos de edad. Su madre fue de origen chamicuro, pero no me acuerdo qué detalles me contó acerca de la filiación étnica de su padre. Don Gregorio, como yo solía llamarlo en espaĖol, era nativohablante del chamicuro, pero también hablaba espaĖol y el quechua de San Martín a la perfección. Su esposa, Elisa Sangama Inuma, tenía 64 aĖos en 1985. Ambos padres de ella eran de origen chamicuro, y ella también era nativohablante de la lengua. Gregorio y Elisa tuvieron varios hijos, pero es probable que éstos no hablen el chamicuro con fluidez. Se supone que ellos se comunican en espaĖol como primera lengua, al igual que todos los demás descendientes de los chamicuros que viven en Pampa Hermosa actualmente. El seĖor Alfonso Patow Chota, quien en ese entonces vivía en Yurimaguas, también ayudó en el estudio del chamicuro. El padre de don Alfonso, Rodolfo Patow, había sido el patrón en Pampa Hermosa. Alfonso hablaba el espaĖol como primera lengua, pero también comprendía el chamicuro bastante bien cuando Gregorio hablaba. Don Gregorio fue la única fuente de donde se obtuvieron todas las palabras, oraciones y textos orales que sirvieron de base a las transcripciones escritas que hice del chamicuro oral. Al mismo tiempo, don Alfonso nos ayudó a glosar todos los materiales en espaĖol, pero no hice transcripción alguna de su pronunciación del habla chamicuro. A ambos caballeros les pagamos por su colaboración. En verdad tengo una gran deuda con los dos por su valiosa ayuda al estudiar el chamicuro, y quisiera aprovechar esta oportunidad para reiterarles mi profunda gratitud.

 

ņCuándo se recopilaron estos datos?

 

Empecé a trabajar personalmente con la lengua chamicuro en septiembre del 1985, en mi calidad de miembro del Instituto Lingüístico de Verano. Actualmente esta organización se conoce en inglés como SIL International. En aquel tiempo trabajé con don Gregorio y don Alfonso aproximadamente durante un mes. En 1987 me puse en contacto con ellos nuevamente y trabajamos durante varias semanas adicionales. Mi tercera y última sesión de elicitación tuvo lugar en noviembre del 1993, durante unos días.

 

ņDónde se recopilaron estos datos?

 

Las sesiones de 1985 y 1987 se llevaron a cabo en el centro del ILV en Yarinacocha, Pucallpa, Perú. En 1993, en cambio, trabajamos in situ, primero en Pampa Hermosa, y después en Yurimaguas.

 

ņQué tipos de datos se recopilaron?

 

El corpus total de datos del chamicuro que elicité consiste en más de 1000 palabras léxicas individuales, siete textos (historias) de diferentes géneros, y extensos paradigmas morfosintácticos. Ésas sirvieron de base principal a los datos que se presentan aquí. Desafortunadamente hasta donde yo sé, no existe ninguna grabación oral ni visual del habla chamicuro viva.

 

ņCómo se elicitaron estos datos?

 

Para elicitar estos datos le decía a don Gregorio una palabra o frase en espaĖol, y él traducía y pronunciaba la expresión equivalente en chamicuro. Don Alfonso nos ayudaba escuchando atentamente para asegurarse que las expresiones en chamicuro tuvieran las mejores expresiones equivalentes en espaĖol.

 


ņCómo se han transcrito estos datos?

 

A medida que don Gregorio pronunciaba cada palabra o frase en chamicuro (en 1985), yo escribía ambas expresiones (chamicuro y espaĖol) en papel, utilizando el alfabeto fonético americanista para las expresiones en chamicuro. Durante las sesiones en 1987 y 1993, sin embargo, utilicé una combinación del mismo alfabeto fonético y una ortografía fonémica práctica que yo había desarrollado para publicar materiales en chamicuro. En los datos que se presentan aquí, también usamos el sistema de transcripción americanista puesto que la mayoría de las obras publicadas que incluyen datos del chamicuro emplean este sistema. A continuación enumeramos y definimos algunos de los símbolos fonéticos que se usan para transcribir los datos chamicuros en este artículo, incluyendo sus equivalentes básicos en el AFI (Alfabeto Fonético Internacional o IPA por sus siglas en inglés).

 

[a] = [ɑ] = vocal baja, central, y no redondeada

[š] = [ʃ] = fricativa alveopalatal sorda

[ṣ̌] = fricativa alveopalatal retrofleja sorda

[š̯] =  fricativa laminoalveolar sorda, un alófono de /š/ delante de la vocal /i/

[š̯y] = fricativa laminoalveolar palatalizada sorda, un alófono de /š/ delante de la vocal /e/

[ts] = [t͡s] = africada alveolar sorda

[č] = [t͡ʃ] = africada alveopalatal sorda

[č̣] = [t͡ṣ̌] = africada alveopalatal retrofleja sorda

[ƚ] = fricativa lateral alveolar sorda, un alófono de /l/ que aparece en posición final de sílaba

[d͡l] = africada lateral alveolar sonora, un alófono optativo de /l/ entre vocales

[ly] = [ʎ] = lateral (alveo)palatal sonora (aproximante)

[Ė] = nasal alveopalatal sonora

[y] = [j] = semiconsonante o aproximante palatal sonora

[ř] = [ɾ] = vibrante simple alveolar sonora (en las palabras prestadas)

[ɩ] = [ɪ] =  vocal alta, anterior, no tensa, y no redondeada, un alófono de /i/ en ciertas sílabas

     cerradas

[] = [ć] = fricativa palatal sorda, un alófono optativo de /h/ después de la vocal /i/

[W] = [] = semiconsonante (aproximante) labial-velar sorda, un alófono de /w/ y /h/ en

        posición final de sílaba

[Y] = [] = semiconsonante (aproximante) palatal sorda, un alófono de /y/ en posición final de

       sílaba

(i) = una vocal subyacente abstracta que se ha postulado por motivos fonológicos, la cual se

        suprime en las formas superficiales

[a] = una vocal “eco” no silábica y no fonémica optativa (svarabhakti)

[ę] = una vocal nasalizada

[V:] = [] = vocales alargadas (bimoraicas) contrastivas

[] = vocales que llevan un acénto fonético primario

[] = vocales que llevan un acento fonético secundario

~ = variación libre

 


ņQué significan estos datos?

 

Las glosas en inglés y espaĖol que aparecen en la tabla de datos líneas abajo expresan el significado básico de cada entrada léxica. Algunos de los términos en espaĖol pueden corresponder a la variedad regional que se habla en la selva del Perú, tales como el #155, majás (‘paca’). Además, se emplean las siguientes abreviaturas:

 

adj       adjetivo

esp.      especie de

f           femenino

lit.        literalmente

m         masculino

n          sustantivo

Q         quechua

S          espaĖol

sp.       species (inglés)

tr          transitivo

v          verbo

v.         vide (véase)

 

La abreviatura tr indica un verbo que termina con el sufijo transitivizador /-ne/. Por ejemplo, la palabra #366, /umuʔmekne/, podría traducirse como ‘(yo) traigo algo’.

 

ņCómo están organizados estos datos?

 

La primera columna a la izquierda presenta las palabras en chamicuro utilizando un nivel de transcripción fonémico. Después (a la derecha) aparece la transcripción fonética, y luego la transcripción ortográfica (la que se describe líneas arriba en el párrafo titulado ņCómo se han transcrito estos datos?). Por último se da una glosa en inglés, seguida de la glosa en espaĖol. En cuanto a la dimensión vertical, se enumeran las palabras en orden alfabético ascendente según los segmentos fonémicos del chamicuro, además del deletreo ortográfico correspondiente, el cual sigue las convenciones utilizadas en mis libros publicados en 1987 y 1994a. Estas normas, a su vez, en general son consistentes también con las reglas alfabéticas del espaĖol.

 

ņQué tipo de datos aparecen en este trabajo?

 

Se seleccionó la lista de palabras del chamicuro que aparece líneas abajo para ilustrar las consonantes laríngeas /h/ y /ʔ/. Por lo tanto, cada entrada léxica en este juego de datos contiene uno o más casos de las variantes fonéticas de estos fonemas consonánticos. Véase mi artículo publicado en 2001 para un análisis formal y una discusión acerca del significado teórico de estos segmentos, sobre todo su distribución fonológica en este idioma.

 

ņHasta qué punto podemos confiar en que estos datos son correctos?

 

El trabajo que llevé a cabo para elicitar datos del chamicuro fue diferente del que se lleva a cabo para un programa de campo típico del ILV; pues solamente duró tiempos cortos, y conté con la ayuda de un solo hablante nativo. Por lo tanto, debido a estas limitaciones no disfruté de los beneficios de comprobar mi análisis e hipótesis durante varias sesiones, por muchos aĖos, y con múltiples hablantes. Como consecuencia de esta situación, no considero que mis transcripciones y glosas sean absolutamente concluyentes, a diferencia de los datos que aparecen en un diccionario o gramática que sirve de referencia y que representa el conocimiento profundo de una lengua después de varias décadas de trabajo de campo detallado. Sin embargo, durante las tres sesiones en que tuve contacto con los hablantes del chamicuro, sí pude reconfirmar la mayoría de mis datos — por ejemplo, en el contexto de listas de palabras aisladas vs. paradigmas morfofonémicos vs. textos espontáneos. En consecuencia, podemos confiar en que la mayoría de las formas del chamicuro que se presentan aquí son correctas casi en su totalidad. En los casos en los que aún tengo dudas acerca de la transcripción o la glosa, procuro indicar esto al anotar formas fluctuantes (variación libre), significados alternativos, etc. A largo plazo es sin duda mejor compartir los datos que sí tengo, con las advertencias del caso, en vez de no publicar ninguno.

 

ņHasta qué punto podemos confiar en que estos datos son completos y exhaustivos?

 

La lista de 513 formas (datos) que aparece al final de este documento constituye el juego total de palabras individuales y únicas del chamicuro, elicitadas hasta la fecha, que contiene los fonemas glotales /h/ y/o /ʔ/ (véase la sección líneas arriba titulada ņQué tipo de datos aparecen en este trabajo?). Estas palabras, a su vez, forman parte de una lista más exhaustiva de unas 1031 entradas (véase la sección líneas abajo acerca del tema ņQué otros datos del chamicuro también están disponibles en este mismo sitio de Internet?). Por consiguiente, podemos concluir que aproximadamente un 50% de todas las palabras del chamicuro (en esta muestra) contiene una consonante laríngea fonémica. Sin embargo, como indiqué en el párrafo anterior (ņHasta qué punto podemos confiar en que estos datos son correctos?), es posible que a propósito yo haya omitido en este artículo unas cuantas formas del chamicuro que potencialmente contienen una /h/ o /ʔ/, debido a la incertidumbre de mi parte acerca de su transcripción y/o glosa correcta. Además, algunas de las palabras que aparecen abajo se recolectaron durante mis últimas dos sesiones (1987 y 1993), y por lo tanto se transcribieron con la ortografía fonémica práctica en vez de la fonética (véase ņCómo se han transcrito estos datos?). Como consecuencia, el alófono fricativo palatal sordo optativo final de sílaba ([]) no siempre se distinguía en mis datos de la forma subyacente básica [h]. En cambio, yo solía deletrear ambos tipos de segmentos superficiales de la misma forma, simplemente con la letra “j” (en 1987 y 1993). Ésta fue una decisión intencional de mi parte, y fue motivada por mi deseo de apuntar las expresiones en chamicuro tan rápida y fácilmente como fuese posible. Debido a este hecho, en la lista que se da a continuación unas cuantas de las formas en chamicuro contienen una [h] en posición de coda que en verdad podrían transcribirse más precisamente con el símbolo [] en vez de [h]. No obstante, este problema no es nada serio puesto que tanto la [] como también la [h] son alófonos del mismo fonema en chamicuro y por lo tanto no contrastan, es decir, nunca distinguen dos palabras diferentes que, de otro modo, constituirían un par mínimo. Así que podemos tener mucha confianza en el hecho de que si intercambiáramos una [h] final de sílaba por una [] en estos datos (o vice versa), esto nunca tendría el efecto no deseado de cambiar el significado de estas entradas léxicas del chamicuro.

 


ņQué otros datos del chamicuro también están disponibles en este mismo sitio de Internet?

 

Además de este archivo, también tenemos la intención de colgar en este mismo lugar otros documentos semejantes que contengan los siguientes (sub)grupos de datos del chamicuro: (1) una lista Swadesh que contiene 207 entradas; (2) una lista de palabras que ilustran los tres alófonos del fonema lateral /l/; (3) una lista de palabras prestadas del espaĖol y quechua; (4) una serie de paradigmas morfofonémicos; y (5) una lista casi exhaustiva de todas las palabras léxicas individuales del chamicuro que recolecté.

 

ņQuiénes pueden usar estos datos?

 

Con respecto al consentimiento otorgado por los hablantes del chamicuro, cuando empecé a trabajar con ellos en 1985, este tema ético todavía no había adquirido la importancia que ha llegado a tener actualmente. Por consiguiente, no preparé ningún tipo de documento escrito o grabado para obtener su consentimiento permanente a fin de diseminar los datos que ellos proveyeron. Sin embargo, les habíamos explicado la intención que tenía el ILV de compartir estos datos públicamente, aunque desde luego el Internet todavía no existía. Además, en visitas posteriores que hice a Pampa Hermosa, distribuimos ejemplares de los libros ya producidos a los hablantes, a sus familias y a los jefes del pueblo, y ninguna de estas personas se opuso a esa situación. Por lo tanto, parece que es apropiado poner estos datos al libre alcance del público en este formato para su respectivo estudio académico. En cuanto a lo que a mí se refiere, hay completa libertad de imprimir estos datos, copiarlos, analizarlos y usarlos en obras secundarias (derivadas) sin fines de lucro, con tal que se cite a este documento como la fuente principal, y se le reconozca al seĖor Gregorio Orbe Caro como el hablante chamicuro que proveyó estas formas. El 4 de mayo del 2009 en Dallas, Texas, el Comité que supervisa las investigaciones con seres humanos llevadas a cabo por los miembros del Graduate Institute of Applied Linguistics (Instituto Graduado de Lingüística Aplicada) aprobó la publicación de este manuscrito, siempre y cuando se incluyan los descargos de responsabilidad mencionados anteriormente.

 

ņQué debo hacer si me doy cuenta de un posible error en este archivo?

 

A pesar de mis esfuerzos por mantener estos datos en una forma lo más “limpia” posible, es probable que uno o dos errores se encuentren aquí todavía. Si un lector se da cuenta de que algo en este documento parece que es inconsistente o erróneo, por favor no tenga dudas de informármelo, en mi calidad de autor, a la siguiente dirección: steve-monica_parker@sil.org.

 

Agradecimientos

 

Agradezco a los siguientes colegas (en orden alfabético) por sus comentarios y sugerencias en cuanto a las versiones anteriores de este artículo: Mike Cahill, Tom Headland, Ken Olson, Arden Sanders, Gary Simons, Mary Ruth Wise, y Tom Woodward. Gracias también a Mónica Parker (mi esposa) y a Giuliana López por revisar la versión espaĖola de estas instrucciones y datos. Además, Jim Roberts me ayudó a determinar la ubicación precisa de Pampa Hermosa en el mapa, es decir, sus coordenadas GPS.

 


Wordlist

 

 

phonemic

phonetic

orthographic

English gloss

Spanish gloss

 

fonémica

fonética

ortográfica

glosa en inglés

glosa en espaĖol

       1. 

/ač̣oleʔč̣a/

č̣oléʔč̣a]~[ąč̣od͡léʔč̣a]

ac̈hole’c̈ha

guts, intestines

intestinos, entraĖas, tripas

       2. 

/ahkelohki/

[ąhked͡lóhki]

ajkelojki

heart

corazón

       3. 

/ahkoči/

[ahkóči]

ajkochi

house

casa

       4. 

/ahkolo/

[ahkólo]

ajkolo

scorpion

alacrán, escorpión

       5. 

/ahpaya/

[ahpáya] (S)

ajpaya

papaya

papaya

       6. 

/ahsi/

[áhsi]

ajsi

tooth

diente, muela

       7. 

/ahtakli/

[ahtákli]

ajtakli

flute

flauta

       8. 

/ahtini/

[ahtíni]

ajtini

path, trail

camino, trocha

       9. 

/ahtokali/

[ąhtokáli]

ajtokali

feather headdress

corona, gorra con plumas

    10. 

/akačeloʔta/

[akąčed͡ʔta]

akachelo’ta

certain, frank, true, right, correct

cierto, franco, verdadero, correcto

    11. 

/akiʔṣ̌o/

[akíʔṣ̌o]

aki’s̈ho

cane

bastón

    12. 

/alaʔye/

[aláʔye]

ala’ye

that one

ése, ésa

    13. 

/alihkwaʔtakoči/

[alďhkwaʔtakóči]

alijkwa’takochi

fever

fiebre

    14. 

/amehkisi/

[ąmehkísi]

amejkisi

needle

aguja

    15. 

/amiʔti/

[amíʔti]

ami’ti

smoked (food) (adj)

ahumado

    16. 

/anaskahneye/

[anąskahnéye]

anaskajneye

something

algo

    17. 

/anaʔšana/

[ąnaʔšána]~[anąʔšána]

ana’shana (v. 18–19)

here

aquí, acá

    18. 

/anaʔšanaye/

[anąʔšanáye]

ana’shanaye (v. 17, 19)

someone, somebody

alguien

    19. 

/anaʔye/

[anáʔye]

ana’ye (v. 17–18)

this one

éste, ésta

    20. 

/apehta/

[apéhta]

apejta

sardine

sardina

    21. 

/ašmuleʔkolo/

[ašmĚd͡leʔkód͡lo]

ashmule’kolo

wooden club

macana

    22. 

/ašpihkaʔčači/

[ašpďhkaʔčáči]

ashpijka’chachi

whip (n)

látigo

    23. 

/ataʔšana/

[ątaʔšána]~[atąʔšána]

ata’shana (v. 24)

there

allí, allá

    24. 

/ataʔye/

[atáʔye]

ata’ye (v. 23)

that one (distal)

aquél, aquélla

    25. 

/ayiʔti/

[ayíʔti]

ayi’ti

now, today

ahora, hoy

    26. 

/aʔlotsiʔta/

[ąʔlotsíʔta]

a’lotsi’ta (v. 134)

near, nearby

cerca

    27. 

/aʔmaṣ̌u:pi/

[ąʔmaṣ̌ú:pi]

a’mas̈huupi

fer-de-lance (snake)

jergón (culebra)

    28. 

/aʔmusnahte/

[ąʔmusnáhte]

a’musnajte (v. 463)

lung

pulmón

    29. 

/aʔpuhki/

[aʔpúhki]

a’pujki

cocoa (tree)

cacao (árbol)

    30. 

/aʔso:wa/

[aʔsó:wa]

a’soowa (v. 131, 468)

sharp(ness)

(tiene) filo

    31. 

/aʔti/

[áʔti]

a’ti

we

nosotros, nosotras

    32. 

/aʔwahko/

[aʔwáhko]

a’wajko

shoulder

hombro

    33. 

/čahč̣oma/

[čahč̣óma]

chajc̈homa (v. 61)

angry, furious, wild, savage

bravo, colérico, rabioso, salvaje

    34. 

/čawasuluhka/

ąwasulúhka]

chawasulujka

hurt, painful, sore

adolorido, doloroso

    35. 

/čayčaʔteči/

ąyčaʔtéči]

chaycha’techi

earring

arete

    36. 

/čenahmuna/

Źnahmúna]

chenajmuna

corbina fish

corvina (pez)

    37. 

/čenaʔto/

[čenáʔto]

chena’to (v. 217)

tree

árbol

    38. 

/čepeʔkiline/

[čepŹʔkilíne]

chepe’kiline

top of the head

corona de la cabeza

    39. 

/čepolalihsa/

[čepėd͡lalíhsa]

chepolalijsa (v. 76)

fermented manioc

masato, yuca fermentada

    40. 

/četoʔna/

[četóʔna]

cheto’na

catfish

bagre (pez)

    41. 

/čihpana/

[čihpána]~[čix̯pána]

chijpana

leaf

hoja

    42. 

/čikloʔti/

[čiklóʔti]

chiklo’ti

otter

nutria

    43. 

/čiloʔti/

[čilóʔti]

chilo’ti

white buzzard, vulture

gallinazo blanco

    44. 

/čiʔnaštaliči/

[čiʔnąštalíči]

chi’nashtalichi

village, city, hamlet

pueblo, caserío, ciudad

    45. 

/čpešaloʔsa/

[čpŹšalóʔsa]

chpeshalo’sa

lukewarm (water)

tibio (agua)

    46. 

/čunka maʔpohta/

[čúŋka maʔpóhta]

chunka ma’pojta (v. 190)

twelve

doce

    47. 

/čyahpeči/

[čyahpéči]

chyajpechi

sickness

enfermedad

    48. 

/č̣ihta/

[č̣íhta]~[č̣íx̯ta]

c̈hijta (v. 49)

earth, ground, lot

tierra, suelo, terreno

    49. 

/č̣ihtawa/

[č̣ihtáwa]

c̈hijtawa (v. 48)

low

bajo

    50. 

/č̣kwaʔti/

[č̣kwáʔti]

c̈hkwa’ti

guan, cashew bird (curassow)

paujil (ave)

    51. 

/č̣omahši/

[č̣omáhš̯i]

c̈homajshi

grass

hierba

    52. 

/č̣omahtaka/

[č̣ėmahtáka]

c̈homajtaka (v. 98, 133, 170–171, 243, 253, 277, 298, 513)

person

persona, cristiano

    53. 

/č̣oʔkapeli/

[č̣ėʔkapéli]

c̈ho’kapeli

fishhook

anzuelo

    54. 

/č̣oʔkota/

[č̣oʔkóta]

c̈ho’kota

cricket

grillo

    55. 

/č̣oʔmeki/

[č̣oʔméki]

c̈ho’meki

palm tree sp.

huasaí (palmera)

    56. 

/č̣oʔmelo/

[č̣oʔmélo]~[č̣oʔméd͡lo]

c̈ho’melo

tucuma palm

chonta

    57. 

/ehe/

[ę́hę]

eje

yes

    58. 

/eʔteṣ̌uli/

[Źʔteṣ̌úli]

e’tes̈huli

flu, cold, cough

gripe, tos

    59. 

/ič̣oloʔtuke/

[ič̣ėloʔtúke]

ic̈holo’tuke

it drips

gotea

    60. 

/ihča/

[íhča]

ijcha (v. 199)

cord

cuerda

    61. 

/ihčač̣oma/

[ďhčač̣óma]

ijchac̈homa (v. 33)

angry

enojado, molesto

    62. 

/ihčala/

[ihčála]

ijchala

worn out, old, broken (clothes)

gastado, viejo, roto (ropa)

    63. 

/ihčapyani/

[ďhčapyáni]

ijchapyani

sick

enfermo

    64. 

/ihč̣o:lo/

[ihč̣ó:lo]

ijc̈hoolo

fence, wall

cerco

    65. 

/ihki/

[íhki]~[íx̯ki]

ijki (v. 305)

seed

semilla

    66. 

/ihlapi/

[ihlápi]

ijlapi

bank (of a river or lake); border, boundary

orilla; borde, límite

    67. 

/ihmilaki/

[ďhmiláki]

ijmilaki

it melts

se derrite

    68. 

/ihmulalaki/

[ihmĚlaláki]

ijmulalaki

earthquake

terremoto

    69. 

/ihnaʔto/

[ihnáʔto]

ijna’to (v. 217)

(its) trunk (of a tree)

(su) tronco (de un árbol)

    70. 

/ihpaʔli/

[ihpáʔli]~[ix̯páʔli]

ijpa’li

(tree) roots

raíces (de un árbol)

    71. 

/ihpe/

[íhpe]~[íx̯pe]

ijpe (v. 115)

dust

polvo

    72. 

/ihpola/

[ihpóla]

ijpola

mud

barro

    73. 

/ihpolataki/

[ihpėlatáki]

ijpolataki

skull, cranium

calavera, cráneo

    74. 

/ihpu:le/

[ihpú:le]

ijpuule

bubbles, foam

burbuja, espuma

    75. 

/ihpuʔti/

[ihpúʔti]

ijpu’ti

it is stuck on, glued on

está pegado

    76. 

/ihsa/

[íhsa]

ijsa (v. 39, 77, 208, 228, 370)

(his/her) juice, soup, liquid

(su) jugo, sopa, líquido (de él/ella)

    77. 

/ihsanaʔto/

[ďhsanáʔto]

ijsana’to (v. 76, 217)

(its) sap

(su) savia

    78. 

/ihsenesi/

[ďhsenési]

ijsenesi

(the day is) waking up, dawning

(el día) está amaneciendo

    79. 

/ihsoʔno/

[ihsóʔno]

ijso’no

(its) price

(su) precio

    80. 

/ihsuʔpa/

[ihsúʔpa]~[ix̯súʔpa]

ijsu’pa

green

verde

    81. 

/ihṣ̌oʔlokala/

[ihṣ̌ėʔlokála]

ijs̈ho’lokala

skull, cranium

calavera, cráneo

    82. 

/ihṣ̌waketasi/

[ihṣ̌wąketási]

ijs̈hwaketasi

(the day is) dawning

(el día) está amaneciendo

    83. 

/ihtaka/

[ihtáka]

ijtaka

(its) scale

(su) escama

 

    84. 

/ihtaṣ̌o/

[ihtáṣ̌o]

ijtas̈ho

(its) stem (of a plant)

(su) tallo (de una planta)

    85. 

/ihtayini/

[ďhtayíni]

ijtayini

footprint

huella

    86. 

/ihtiši/

[ihtíš̯i]~[ix̯tíš̯i]

ijtishi

(its) root

(su) raíz

    87. 

/ihtuʔlu/

[ihtúʔlu]

ijtu’lu

(its) roof

(su) techo

    88. 

/ihyema/

[ihyéma]

ijyema

(its) sound

(su) sonido

    89. 

/ikakwiʔti/

[ďkakwíʔti]

ikakwi’ti

awake

despierto

    90. 

/ikamoloʔti/

[ikąmolóʔti]

ikamolo’ti

(he/she is) sad

(él/ella está) triste

    91. 

/ikehta/

[ikéhta]

ikejta

sky

cielo

    92. 

/ilyaʔlankati/

[ilyąʔlaŋkáti]

ilya’lankati (v.
349–350)

married

casado

    93. 

/imačakuluʔti/

[ďmačąkulúʔti]

imachakulu’ti

leishmaniasis

uta, llaga de la nariz

    94. 

/imahka/

[imáhka]

imajka

(its) nest

(su) nido

    95. 

/imuhki/

[imúhki]

imujki

flood; (the water) is rising

inundación; (el agua) está creciendo

    96. 

/ipaʔpišistale/

[ďpaʔpďš̯istále]

ipa’pishistale

he/she lacks, needs it

le hace falta (a él/ella), lo necesita

    97. 

/ipekahti/

[ďpekáhti]

ipekajti

it flowers, blooms

florece, florea

    98. 

/iplahč̣oma/

[ďplahč̣óma]

iplajc̈homa (v. 52, 243)

(his/her/its) size

(su) tamaĖo (de él/ella)

    99. 

/išihtuni/

[ďš̯ihtúni]

ishijtuni

it closes (itself)

se cierra

 100. 

/iṣ̌ahpasi/

[ďṣ̌ahpási]

is̈hajpasi

rotten; it’s rotting

podrido; se está pudriendo

 101. 

/iṣ̌oʔkoʔlo/

ṣ̌oʔkóʔlo]

is̈ho’ko’lo

ravine, gully, gorge

barranco, precipicio

 102. 

/iṣ̌oʔye/

[iṣ̌óʔye]

is̈ho’ye

its beak, bill

su pico

 103. 

/iṣ̌uhkulu/

ṣ̌uhkúd͡lu]~
ṣ̌uWkúd͡lu]

is̈hujkulu

jungle

selva, monte

 104. 

/itaʔla/

[itáʔla]

ita’la

her skirt

su falda (de ella)

 105. 

/itepoʔsa/

[ďtepóʔsa]

itepo’sa

well (n)

pozo

 106. 

/itiskaʔne/

[ďtiskáʔne]

itiska’ne

(he/she is) alone

(él/ella está) solo

 107. 

/itoʔna/

[itóʔna]

ito’na

its snout

su hocico

 108. 

/itsoʔme/

[itsóʔme]

itso’me

corner

rincón

 109. 

/iʔmehki/

[iʔméhki]

i’mejki

itch, mange, scabies

sarna, mancha de la piel

 110. 

/iʔsuluhki/

[ďʔsulúhki]

i’sulujki

(he/she is) furious, angry

(él/ella está) furioso, enojado

 111. 

/iʔyihkušana/

[iʔyďhkušána]

i’yijkushana

above, on top of

encima (de)

 112. 

/kaha/

[káha] (S)

kaja

box

caja

 113. 

/kahčetalo/

[kąhčetád͡lo]

kajchetalo

spider monkey

mono maquisapa

 114. 

/kahči/

[káhči]

kajchi (v. 115)

fire, firewood

fuego, candela, leĖa

 115. 

/kahčihpe/

[kahčíhpe]~[kahčíx̯pe]

kajchijpe (v. 71, 114)

ash(es)

ceniza(s)

 116. 

/kahnena/

[kahnéna]

kajnena

what?

ņqué?

 117. 

/kahpalo/

[kahpálo]

kajpalo

guava tree

guaba (árbol)

 118. 

/kahpayi/

[kahpáyi]

kajpayi

thorn

espina

 119. 

/kahpeʔta/

[kahpéʔta]

kajpe’ta (v. 168)

day before yesterday

anteayer

 120. 

/kahpihkaseliči/

[kahpďhkaselíči]

kajpijkaselichi

broom

escoba

 121. 

/kahpiši/

[kahpíš̯i]

kajpishi

coati(mundi)

achuni, coatí

 122. 

/kahpu/

[káhpu]

kajpu

bone

hueso

 123. 

/kahpuli/

[kahpúd͡li]

kajpuli

annatto tree

achiote

 124. 

/kahsawa/

[kahsáwa]

kajsawa

basket

canasta

 125. 

/kahsumahtaka/

[kahsĚmahtáka]

kajsumajtaka

(the one who is) pregnant

(la que está) embarazada

 126. 

/kahšali/

[kahšáli]

kajshali

pus

pus

 127. 

/kahṣ̌oli/

[kahṣ̌ód͡li]

kajs̈holi

spider sp.

esp. de araĖa

 128. 

/kahṣ̌opi/

[kahṣ̌ópi]

kajs̈hopi

hole, pit

hoyo, hueco

 129. 

/kahṣ̌oʔmeki/

[kąhṣ̌oʔméki]

kajs̈ho’meki

coal, embers

carbón

 130. 

/kahṣ̌oʔna/

[kahṣ̌óʔna]

kajs̈ho’na

white-lipped peccary

huangana, pecarí

 131. 

/kala aʔso:wa/

[kád͡la aʔsó:wa]

kala a’soowa (v. 30, 468)

dull, not sharp

no (tiene) filo, desafilado

 132. 

/kamahto/

[kamáhto]

kamajto

butterfly

mariposa

 133. 

/kamalahč̣oma/

[kąmalahč̣óma]~

[kąmad͡lahč̣óma]

kamalajc̈homa (v. 52)

white man

hombre blanco, gringo

 134. 

/kapaletsiʔta/

[kapąletsíʔta]

kapaletsi’ta (v. 26)

immediate(ly)

inmediato, inmediatamente

 135. 

/kapapeskahpola/

[kąpapŹskahpóla]

kapapeskajpola

ambitious

ambicioso

 136. 

/kapunutakahpola/

[kąpunĚtakahpóla]

kapunutakajpola

shaman, healer

curandero, chamán

 137. 

/kasenuhsi/

[kąsenúhsi]

kasenujsi

queen bee

abeja reina

 138. 

/kašeleʔtaka/

[kaš̯yŹleʔtáka]

kashele’taka (v. 267, 404)

(the one who is) dead, deceased

(el/la que está) muerto, finado, difunto

 139. 

/kaṣ̌ahpa/

[kaṣ̌áhpa]

kas̈hajpa

piranha

piraĖa

 140. 

/katamuhyaka/

[kątamuhyáka]

katamujyaka

(the one who is) diving or swimming under water

(el/la que está) buceando, zambulléndose

 141. 

/katuhkana/

[kątuhkána]

katujkana

monkey

mono

 142. 

/katsalaʔtaka/

[kątsalaʔtáka]

katsala’taka

broken

roto

 143. 

/kawalika unihsa/

[kąwalíka uníhsa]

kawalika unijsa (v. 370)

waterfall

cascada, catarata (agua que está cayendo)

 144. 

/kaʔčakamawa/

[kaʔčąkamáwa]

ka’chakamawa

yellow

amarillo

 145. 

/kaʔnakosilo/

[kaʔnąkosílo]

ka’nakosilo

tremor (ground)

temblor

 146. 

/kaʔnilšeye/

[kąʔnɩƚš̯yéye]

ka’nilsheye

ancestor, ancient

antepasado, antiguo

 147. 

/kaʔpeli/

[kaʔpéli]

ka’peli

insect sp., mite

isango (esp. de ácaro)

 148. 

/kenahko/

[kenáhko]

kenajko

jungle

monte, selva

 149. 

/keʔmaki/

[keʔmáki]

ke’maki

star apple tree

caimito (árbol)

 150. 

/kihšeti/

[kihš̯yéti]

kijsheti

cotton

algodón

 151. 

/kihšili/

[kihš̯íli]

kijshili

mouse

ratón, sachacuy

 152. 

/kinahti/

[kináhti]

kinajti

forward, ahead

adelante

 153. 

/klawohkolo/

[kląwohkólo] (S)

klawojkolo

(metal) nail

clavo

 154. 

/klošnahta/

[klošnáhta]

kloshnajta

ankle

tobillo

 155. 

/kohtali/

[kohtáli]

kojtali

paca rodent

majás, paca, picuro

 156. 

/koloʔšeta/

[kėd͡loʔš̯yéta]

kolo’sheta

oar, paddle (n)

remo (n)

 157. 

/koloʔtoʔpi/

[kėd͡loʔtóʔpi]

kolo’to’pi

meadow, pasture, field

pasto, pajonal, prado

 158. 

/koneʔlawa/

[kėneʔláwa]

kone’lawa

younger sister (of a female)

hermana menor (de una mujer)

 159. 

/kuhpawaʔto/

[kĚhpawáʔto]

kujpawa’to

frog

rana

 160. 

/kuhtu/

[kúhtu]

kujtu

foot, paw

pie, pata

 161. 

/kuhtseʔla/

[kuhtséʔla]

kujtse’la

silver dollar fish sp.

palometa (pez)

 162. 

/kuʔkuli/

[kuʔkúli]

ku’kuli

pioneer tree

cetico (árbol)

 163. 

/kuʔti/

[kúʔti]

ku’ti

roasted fish

patarashca

 164. 

/kweʔla/

[kwéʔla]

kwe’la

sparrow hawk

gavilán

 165. 

/kyaʔti/

[kyáʔti]

kya’ti

large toucan sp.

esp. de tucán grande

 166. 

/lačeʔta/

[lačéʔta]

lache’ta

last night

anoche

 167. 

/lahpaʔsači/

[ląhpaʔsáči]

lajpa’sachi (v. 346)

drink (n)

bebida

 168. 

/likahpeʔta/

[lďkahpéʔta]

likajpe’ta (v. 119)

yesterday

ayer

 169. 

/lokoteʔṣ̌oʔloči/

[lėkoteʔṣ̌oʔlóči]~ [lėkoteʔṣ̌olóči]

lokote’s̈ho’lochi

blowgun

cerbatana, pucuna

 170. 

/lotaʔč̣oma/

[lėtaʔč̣óma]

lota’c̈homa (v. 52)

companion

compaĖero

 171. 

/mačeʔč̣oma/

[mąčeʔč̣óma]

mache’c̈homa (v. 52, 172)

ugly man

hombre feo

 172. 

/mačeʔpa/

[mačéʔpa]

mache’pa (v. 171)

ugly woman

mujer fea

 173. 

/mačeʔpelihši/

[mačŹʔpelíhš̯i]

mache’pelijshi

coriander

culantro

 174. 

/mahčayi/

[mahčáyi]

majchayi

deaf

sordo

 175. 

/mahčelo/

[mahčélo]

majchelo

crab

cangrejo

 176. 

/mahnačalelo/

[mahnąčalélo]

majnachalelo (v. 367)

mute

mudo

 177. 

/mahpolo/

[mahpód͡lo]

majpolo

yellow-footed tortoise

motelo, tortuga

 178. 

/mahtoli/

[mahtód͡li]

majtoli

tapir

tapir, sachavaca

 179. 

/makuhtoʔpi/

[mąkuhtóʔpi]~

[mąkuWtóʔpi]

makujto’pi

ditch reed, uva grass, giant cane

caĖa brava

 180. 

/masoʔpi/

[masóʔpi]

maso’pi

skunk

zorrillo

 181. 

/maṣ̌kohpe/

[maṣ̌kóhpe]

mas̈hkojpe

sand, beach

arena, playa

 182. 

/mataʔwa/

[matáʔwa]

mata’wa

red-throated caracara bird

(t)atatao (ave)

 183. 

/maʔkoleti/

[mąʔkoléti]

ma’koleti (v. 352)

thief

ladrón, ratero

 184. 

/maʔkona/

[maʔkóna]

ma’kona

potato sp.

papa, sachapapa

 185. 

/maʔluṣ̌ana/

[mąʔluṣ̌ána]

ma’lus̈hana

termite

comején

 186. 

/maʔmoli/

[maʔmóli]

ma’moli

shad fish

sábalo (pez)

 187. 

/maʔnali/

[maʔnád͡li]~[maʔanáli]

ma’nali (v. 188)

dog

perro

 188. 

/maʔnaltokiti/

[maʔnąƚtokíti]~

[maʔanąƚtokíti]

ma’naltokiti (v. 187)

jaguar

jaguar, tigre

 189. 

/maʔpata/

[maʔpáta]

ma’pata

bed

cama

 190. 

/maʔpohta/

[maʔpóhta]~[maʔapóhta]

ma’pojta (v. 46, 191)

two

dos

 191. 

/maʔpohtaʔmala/

[maʔpėhtaʔmád͡la]~

[maʔapėhtaʔmád͡la]

ma’pojta’mala (v. 190, 192)

four

cuatro

 

    192. 

/maʔpohtaʔmala čunka/

[maʔpėhtaʔmád͡la čúŋka]

ma’pojta’mala chunka (v. 191)

forty

cuarenta

    193. 

/maʔpwalo/

[maʔpwálo]

ma’pwalo

twin

gemelo, mellizo

    194. 

/maʔša/

[máʔša]

ma’sha

many, a lot, sufficient

mucho(s), bastante(s), suficiente(s)

    195. 

/maʔšeti/

[maʔš̯yéti]

ma’sheti

owl

lechuza, búho

    196. 

/maʔšiʔto/

[maʔš̯íʔto]~[maʔš̯íʔito]

ma’shi’to

bee sp.

esp. de abeja

    197. 

/meloʔti/

[med͡lóʔti]

melo’ti

knee

rodilla

    198. 

/mepolahyaka/

[mepėlahyáka]

mepolajyaka

never

jamás, nunca

    199. 

/mespihča/

[mespíhča]

mespijcha (v. 60)

rope

soga

    200. 

/meyanaʔšanaye/

[mŹyanąʔšanáye]

meyana’shanaye

no one, nobody, none

nadie, ninguno

    201. 

/meʔna/

[méʔna]

me’na

woodpecker

pájaro carpintero

    202. 

/meʔsa/

[méʔsa]

me’sa

giant otter

lobo marino, lobo del río

    203. 

/meʔsawa/

[meʔsáwa]

me’sawa (v. 391, 454)

cold (adj)

frío (adj)

    204. 

/molokotohši/

[mėlokotóhš̯i]

molokotojshi

palm tree sp.

ojo de palmiche (palmera)

    205. 

/moʔsohko/

[moʔsóhko]

mo’sojko

sun

sol

    206. 

/mu:šihki/

[mu:š̯íhki]

muushijki

peanut

maní

    207. 

/naspehka/

[naspéhka]

naspejka

few, a little bit, a piece of

poco(s), poquito, un pedazo de

    208. 

/našihsa/

[naš̯íhsa]

nashijsa (v. 76)

fermented corn drink

chicha de maíz

    209. 

/naʔkolyaye/

[nąʔkolyáye]

na’kolyaye

when?

ņcuándo?

    210. 

/naʔlayana/

[nąʔlayána]

na’layana

which (one)?, what

kind?, what type?

ņcuál?, ņqué clase?,

ņqué tipo?

    211. 

/naʔna/

[náʔna]

na’na

how?

ņcómo?

    212. 

/naʔpuč̣lehka/

[nąʔpuč̣léhka]

na’puc̈hlejka

bump, swelling

bola, bulto

    213. 

/naʔsekolohka/

[nąʔsekolóhka]

na’sekolojka

thin

delgado, flaco

    214. 

/naʔšanana/

[nąʔšanána]

na’shanana

who?

ņquién?

    215. 

/naʔtepelehka/

[nąʔtepeléhka]

na’tepelejka (v. 320)

round, circle

redondo, círculo

    216. 

/naʔteštehka/

[nąʔteštéhka]

na’teshtejka

wide

ancho

    217. 

/naʔto/

[náʔto]

na’to (v. 37, 69, 77)

trunk, wood

tronco, madera

    218. 

/naʔyehčoma/

[nąʔyehčóma]

na’yejchoma

small, short

pequeĖo, chico, corto

    219. 

/naʔyeni/

[naʔyéni]

na’yeni

where?

ņdónde, adónde?

    220. 

/nihpa/

[níhpa]~[níx̯pa]

nijpa

louse

piojo

    221. 

/nukaʔč̣omači/

[nĚkaʔč̣omáči]

nuka’c̈homachi

food

comida

    222. 

/nuʔpihkaplehča/

[nuʔpďhkapléhča]

nu’pijkaplejcha

throat

garganta

    223. 

/očaʔtina/

čaʔtína]

ocha’tina

sugar cane

caĖa de azúcar

    224. 

/ohki/

[óhki]

ojki (v. 228)

eye

ojo

    225. 

/ohpana/

[ohpána]

ojpana

liver

hígado

    226. 

/ohpili/

[ohpíli]

ojpili

night monkey

mono musmuque

    227. 

/ohyako/

[ohyáko]

ojyako

injury, wound

herida

    228. 

/okihsa/

[okíhsa]

okijsa (v. 76, 224)

tear(drop) (n)

lágrima

    229. 

/onohko/

[onóhko]

onojko

up, above, tall

arriba, alto

    230. 

/oʔkaknastaʔkala/

[ėʔkaknąstaʔkála]

o’kaknasta’kala

pillow

almohada

    231. 

/pačawahka/

[pąčawáhka]

pachawajka

different, distinct, another kind/type

diferente, distinto, otra clase, otro tipo

    232. 

/pahna/

[páhna]

pajna (v. 233)

other, another

otro

    233. 

/pahnakana/

[pąhnakána]

pajnakana (v. 232)

some

alguno(s)

    234. 

/palahta/

[paláhta]

palajta

side

lado

    235. 

/paʔsawa/

[paʔsáwa]

pa’sawa

dirty

sucio

    236. 

/pčahtoki/

[pčahtóki]

pchajtoki

wild, fierce (animal)

feroz, bravo (animal)

    237. 

/peskiʔtuhka/

[pŹskiʔtúhka]

peski’tujka

slow(ly)

despacio, lento

    238. 

/pewa putiʔna/

[péwa putíʔna]

pewa puti’na

handsome, beautiful

bello, hermoso

    239. 

/peʔča/

[péʔča]

pe’cha

soft

blando, suave

    240. 

/piʔti/

[píʔti]~[píʔiti]

pi’ti (v. 241)

you (singular)

tú, usted

    241. 

/piʔtisi/

[piʔtísi]

pi’tisi (v. 240)

you (plural)

ustedes, vosotros

    242. 

/piʔto/

[píʔto]~[píʔito]

pi’to

canoe

canoa

    243. 

/plahč̣oma/

[plahč̣óma]

plajc̈homa (v. 52, 98)

tall

alto (adj)

    244. 

/pnahmule/

[pnahmúd͡le]

pnajmule

swamp, marsh

pantano

    245. 

/pohkili/

[pohkíli]

pojkili

gadfly, horsefly sp.

tábano negro

    246. 

/pohkoṣ̌waye/

[pėhkoṣ̌wáye]

pojkos̈hwaye

tinamou partridge sp.

panguana (esp. de perdiz)

    247. 

/polawaʔti/

[pėd͡lawáʔti]

polawa’ti

cloud

nube

    248. 

/polohti/

[pod͡lóhti]

polojti

tobacco

tabaco

    249. 

/puhči/

[púhči]

pujchi

baby animal

cría (de animal)

    250. 

/puhsemu/

[puhsému]

pujsemu

cobweb

telaraĖa

    251. 

/puhtuku/

[puhtúku]

pujtuku

dove

paloma

    252. 

/pwaʔto/

[pwáʔto]

pwa’to

sapodilla or marmalade tree

zapote (árbol)

    253. 

/pyaʔč̣oma/

[pyaʔč̣óma]

pya’c̈homa (v. 52, 255)

handsome, beautiful (m)

hermoso, lindo, bello (m)

    254. 

/pyaʔkihnani/

[pyąʔkihnáni]

pya’kijnani

happy, glad, content

alegre, feliz, contento

    255. 

/pyaʔpa/

[pyáʔpa]

pya’pa (v. 253)

beautiful, pretty (f)

hermosa, linda, bella (f)

    256. 

/pyaʔsino/

[pyaʔsíno]

pya’sino

smooth, flat

liso, plano

    257. 

/sanaʔne/

[sanáʔne]

sana’ne

soul, spirit

alma, espíritu

    258. 

/saʔpu/

[ʔpu]

sa’pu (v. 259)

lake

lago, cocha

 

    259. 

/saʔpuč̣u/

[saʔč̣u]

sa’puc̈hu (v. 258)

wet ground, swamp, marsh

Pantano

    260. 

/sewuʔti/

[sewúʔti]

sewu’ti

squirrel monkey

mono fraile

    261. 

/sohpayi/

[sohpáyi] (Q)

sojpayi

demon, devil, ghost

demonio, diablo, fantasma

    262. 

/sokahki/

[sokáhki]

sokajki

fruit

fruta

    263. 

/sokahsu/

[sokáhsu]

sokajsu

insect

insecto

    264. 

/syeʔki/

[syéʔki]

sye’ki

belly

barriga, vientre

    265. 

/šahmisa/

[šahmísa]

shajmisa

dew

rocío

    266. 

/šakiʔsu/

[šakíʔsu]

shaki’su

tick, chigger

garrapata

    267. 

/šeleʔta/

[š̯yeléʔta]

shele’ta (v. 138, 404)

deceased, dead

difunto, finado, muerto

    268. 

/šeʔṣ̌o/

[š̯yéʔṣ̌o]

she’s̈ho

prochilodus fish sp.

boquichico (pez)

    269. 

/šihpa/

[š̯íx̯pa]

shijpa

hand

mano

    270. 

/šilipiʔsa/

[š̯ďlipíʔsa]

shilipi’sa

fast moving (river)

(río) corriente

    271. 

/šiliskaʔtuke/

[š̯ilďskaʔtúke]

shiliska’tuke

stepfather

padrastro

    272. 

/šiliškaʔtepiči/

[š̯ilďškaʔtepíči]

shilishka’tepichi

bow (for arrows)

arco

    273. 

ipičuhsi/

[š̯ďpičúhsi]

shipichujsi

gadfly, horsefly sp.

tábano blanco

    274. 

/šipotoṣ̌kaʔṣ̌oʔloči/

[š̯ďpotėṣ̌kaʔṣ̌oʔči]

shipotos̈hka’s̈ho’lochi

shotgun

escopeta

    275. 

/šiʔtana/

[š̯iʔtána]

shi’tana

red mullet fish

lisa roja (pez)

    276. 

pakiʔteči/

[špąkiʔtéči]

shpaki’techi

ring

anillo

    277. 

/ṣ̌amleʔč̣oma/

[ṣ̌ąmleʔč̣óma]

s̈hamle’c̈homa (v. 52)

coward

cobarde

    278. 

/ṣ̌aʔme/

[ṣ̌áʔme]

s̈ha’me

shade, shadow

sombra

    279. 

/ṣ̌ohta/

[ṣ̌óhta]

s̈hojta

big

grande

    280. 

/ṣ̌uʔna/

[ṣ̌úʔna]~[ṣ̌úʔuna]

s̈hu’na

beard

barba

    281. 

/tařahwa/

[tařáhwa] (S)

tarajwa

net for fishing

tarrafa

    282. 

/taʔwohko/

[taʔwóhko]

ta’wojko

far (away)

lejos

    283. 

/tikiʔtsa/

[tikíʔtsa]

tiki’tsa

thick (liquid)

espeso (líquido)

    284. 

/tinoʔsa/

[tinóʔsa]

tino’sa

fast running, rapid (river)

corriente, rápido (río)

    285. 

/tiš(i)kiliʔtakano/

[tďš̯kilďʔtakáno]

tishkili’takano

cheek

mejilla

    286. 

/toʔloki/

[toʔlóki]

to’loki

moriche palm tree

aguaje (palmera)

    287. 

/toʔsona/

[toʔsóna]

to’sona

shinbone

espinilla (el hueso)

    288. 

/tukihtaka/

[tĚkihtáka]

tukijtaka

scarab, black beetle

escarabajo

    289. 

/tuʔlu/

[túʔlu]~[túʔulu]

tu’lu

chest

pecho

    290. 

/tsemoʔye/

[tsemóʔye]

tsemo’ye

vulture, buzzard

gallinazo negro, buitre

    291. 

/tsepeʔta/

[tsepéʔta]

tsepe’ta

wooden grill for smoking food

barbacoa, parrilla hecha de madera

    292. 

/tsikiʔna/

[tsikíʔna]~[tsikíʔina]

tsiki’na

narrow

estrecho

    293. 

/tsoʔpa/

[tsóʔpa]

tso’pa

cockroach

cucaracha

    294. 

/učaʔlaki/

čaʔláki]

ucha’laki

I urinate

orino

    295. 

/učehki/

[učéhki]

uchejki

I burn

quemo, ardo

    296. 

/učeltsakamaʔti/

[učɛ̀ƚtsakamáʔti]

ucheltsakama’ti

I shout

grito (v)

    297. 

/učiʔni/

[učíʔni]

uchi’ni

I stay, remain

me quedo

    298. 

/uč̣omatihpati/

č̣omątihpáti]

uc̈homatijpati (v. 52)

I give birth, bear

doy a luz, paro

    299. 

/uč̣oʔki/

[uč̣óʔki]

uc̈ho’ki

I row, paddle (a canoe)

remo (una canoa)

    300. 

/uč̣oʔpi/

[uč̣óʔpi]

uc̈ho’pi

my nape

mi nuca

    301. 

/uhčeliki/

[Ěhčelíki]

ujcheliki (v. 302)

I call

llamo

    302. 

/uhčelikne/

[Ěhčelíkne]

ujchelikne (v. 301)

I call (tr)

llamo (tr)

    303. 

/uhčiʔtale/

[Ěhčiʔtále]

ujchi’tale

I repeat it

lo/la repito

    304. 

/uhkahki/

[uhkáhki]

ujkajki

I vomit

vomito

    305. 

/uhki/

[úhki]

ujki (v. 65)

my son (=my seed)

mi hijo (=mi semilla)

    306. 

/uhkiʔye/

[uhkíʔye]

ujki’ye

my waist

mi cintura

    307. 

/uhkoʔti/

[uhkóʔti]

ujko’ti

I fish

pesco

    308. 

/uhnala/

[uhnála]

ujnala (v. 310)

my armpit, axilla

mi sobaco, axila

    309. 

/uhpač̣uʔtale/

[uhpąč̣uʔtále]

ujpac̈hu’tale

I hug him/her/it

lo/la abrazo

    310. 

/uhpwanala/

[Ěhpwanála]

ujpwanala (v. 308)

my armpit hair

mi vello (del sobaco)

    311. 

/uhsepihti/

[Ěhsepíhti]~[Ěhsepíx̯ti]

ujsepijti

I live

vivo (v)

    312. 

/uhsi/

[úhsi]

ujsi

my name

mi nombre

    313. 

/uhšakasi/

[Ěhšakási]

ujshakasi

I stink, smell bad

apesto, hiedo

    314. 

/uhšiliki/

[Ěhš̯ilíki]

ujshiliki

I lower, go down

bajo (v)

    315. 

/uhṣ̌atake/

[Ěhṣ̌atáke]

ujs̈hatake

my stepmother

mi madrastra

    316. 

/uhṣ̌oloʔkala/

[uhṣ̌ėloʔkála]

ujs̈holo’kala

my skull, cranium

mi calavera, cráneo

    317. 

/uhṣ̌one/

[uhṣ̌óne]

ujs̈hone

I (tell a) lie

miento

    318. 

/uhtačaskiti/

[Ěhtačaskíti]

ujtachaskiti (v. 319)

I think, remember

pienso, me acuerdo

    319. 

/uhtačaʔtale/

[Ěhtačaʔtále]

ujtacha’tale (v. 318)